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The Daily Wildcat

The Daily Wildcat

 

    Craig Robinson’s performance truly S.I.C.K.

    Valentina Martinelli/Arizona Daily Wildcat 

Comedy Corner members from left Name, Name and Name make up rap lyrics and dance in an improv-off  against ASU during the first night of the two night S.I.C.K. Comedy Festival in the Gallagher  Theatre on April 30, 2010.
    Valentina Martinelli
    Valentina Martinelli/Arizona Daily Wildcat Comedy Corner members from left Name, Name and Name make up rap lyrics and dance in an improv-off against ASU during the first night of the two night S.I.C.K. Comedy Festival in the Gallagher Theatre on April 30, 2010.

    Craig Robinson’s grinning face has been plastered all over campus on posters promoting “”S.I.C.K.,”” the annual comedy festival organized by the UA’s Comedy Corner. The event, held Friday and Saturday, was worth seeing.

    While Robinson, the actor and comedian made famous by his roles as Darryl on “”The Office”” and most recently as Nick in “”Hot Tub Time Machine,”” drew a massive crowd as the headliner, the rest of S.I.C.K. was equally worth the audiences’ time.

    The Friday improv was the highlight of the student-run performances. Comedy Corner performed with Tucson group Dick! Dick! Dick! in addition to ASU’s troupes Barren Mind and Marvin’s Room.

    The mix made for a diverse and outrageous night. When all four groups did an “”improv jam”” at the end of the show, they complemented each other wonderfully, but the troupes did just as well individually.

    Barren Mind and Marvin’s Room proved that our rivals to the north know as much about comedy as we do. Their group dynamics were fantastic and everyone played off of each other with inventive ideas and expert timing.

    Comedy Corner showed exactly why it is the king of all collegiate Arizona comedy. Sarcasm, slapstick and satire were all integrated to make something truly funny. With a cast of diverse talents, they were a great end to the night.

    ASU’s Farce Side put on a set of clever sketches that started Saturday’s comedy off right. While the humor didn’t leave me laughing as hard as the improv, the sketches were clever, well thought out and relevant to college students.

    Comedy Corner performed an anticipated one-act sketch incorporating video and musical elements along with an elaborate set and costumes. The main story dealt with a group of inmates trying to make a jailbreak.

    The highlight was a parody of “”Cell Block Tango”” from the musical “”Chicago”” called “”They Caught me Cummin’.””

    However, the show did drag sometimes. Transitions tended to last too long, which detracted from the overall momentum. It was, however, the first time the group has put on such a complex sketch.

    Later that night, a horde waited in line to see Robinson perform. As soon as the doors opened, everyone poured in, quickly fillling Social Sciences 100. The room is mainly used for lectures, but it was small enough that the performance still felt personal.

    When Comedy Corner members took the stage to announce that the show was starting, the crowd erupted with excitement. Then they announced a pleasant surprise: opening act Leonard Robinson.

    He bears no relation to Craig Robinson except in how funny they are. Leonard Robinson’s style was different, but his material was crisp. He came out with high energy, raring to go. The audience was receptive and glad to have had him perform, given the applause after his set ended.

    Craig Robinson himself was the best part of the festival and outstandingly hilarious, not only because almost everything he said managed to be funny — even a commonplace hello — but because he interacted directly with the audience.

    Robinson asked questions and included the crowd in his stand-up and musical performances. He even made a veritable public service announcement, informing the audience that it was everyone’s responsibility to stop the “”Twilight”” craze before it got out of hand.

    After the performance both Robinsons stuck around for a brief meet-and-greet, bringing a perfect end to a great weekend of comedy.

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