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The Daily Wildcat

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The Daily Wildcat

The Daily Wildcat

 

    Police Beat: April 17

    An unlucky break

    A UA student reported his truck had been broken into and damaged at 1:30 p.m. on April 14, after he left it in parking lot 1232 overnight.

    A University of Arizona Police Department officer met the student at his damaged 2003 Ford F-150.

    The student said he’d left the truck in the lot from 11 a.m. the day before to 1:30 p.m. that day, and noticed when he returned that the driver side key lock had been damaged.

    He then opened the door and saw that his center console dash was damaged and his Kenwood stereo was missing. His iPod, house keys and duffel bag were missing as well.

    The man told police the truck had been locked when he left and he hadn’t given anyone permission to use it. Police noted that while the driver’s side lock was damaged, it was still functional.

    When police took photos of the damage for evidence, they noticed scratch marks on the brake lock that appeared to be from a sharp object. Police also took fingerprints and sent them to the Department of Public Safety for analysis.

    There are currently no suspects or witnesses. The student said he would like to prosecute if someone were found responsible for the incident.

    Fakers never make it

    A UA student was cited for underage drinking and having a fake ID outside the Electrical and Computer Engineering building at 3:08 a.m. on April 12.

    Police were flagged down by someone who said there was a man who looked very intoxicated on the west side of the ECE building.

    When the man saw officers approaching, he tried to get up and walk away, but had trouble keeping his balance.

    An officer asked the man for identification. As he seemed to be having trouble, the officer asked if he needed help, and was given permission to get the identification from the man’s wallet. While searching for identification, the officer found a CatCard and driver’s licenses from Florida and Arizona.

    The officer then contacted Student Emergency Medical Services to have the student evaluated because he showed signs of intoxication.

    The student claimed he had not had any alcohol, but later changed his mind.

    “To be perfectly honest with you, officer, because I don’t want to lie, I had a little bit,” the student said.

    The officer asked what constituted “a little bit,” and the student replied, “Three months worth.” The officer asked how much that was and the student said he’d drunk four Corona beers. He said he had been drinking at an off-campus house and was returning to his own house when he was stopped.

    The student also confirmed that the Florida driver’s license was fake and said he’d received it from a friend.

    He was then cited for minor in possession of alcohol and unlawful use of a license before being released and taken to his home.

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