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The Daily Wildcat

The Daily Wildcat

 

    Prometheus proves a glorious return to form for Ridley Scott

    Ridley Scott’s latest film, “Prometheus,” is his first sci-fi effort in 30 years, and is absolutely magnificent. It is unquestionably the most visually polished movie he has ever made, and overall the most enjoyable since “Gladiator.”

    The special effects were flawlessly crafted and seamlessly integrated. They were never gratuitous and always contributed to the movie as a whole. The non-CGI visuals were just as impressive: Stunning panoramic landscape shots and meticulously detailed set designs immerse the viewer in Scott’s creation.

    The acting, while not quite as amazing as the scenery and effects, was still very satisfactory.

    Noomi Rapace, who played Lisbeth Salander in the original “Girl with the Dragon Tattoo” movie, was a solid choice for protagonist Elizabeth Shaw and gave a gut-wrenchingly convincing performance. Charlize Theron was well-suited for her role as the chilly and vaguely sinister Meredith Vickers, and the supporting cast all earned their places in the movie. The standout performance, however, was Michael Fassbender in his role as the android David. It was obvious that Fassbender poured substantial time and effort into developing the unsettling mannerisms and attitude that his character exhibited. Every time he was on screen, it was difficult to pay attention to anyone else.

    The plot was simple but interesting. It was largely secondary to the visual spectacle, which is absolutely fine. This isn’t the kind of movie that leaves the audience asking their friends, “What did that mean? What happened in that middle part?” It is a summer blockbuster in the truest, most glorious sense of the term, and it deserves every dollar it makes.

    The overall message here is that you need to go see “Prometheus.” While I did not watch it in 3D, I suspect it might approach the level of a religious experience in that form. Whether you drop the extra two dollars on the plastic glasses or not, this is not a movie to wait for and watch at home. It must be seen on the big screen.

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