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The Daily Wildcat

The Daily Wildcat

 

Project Greenway struts its stuff

Lisa Beth Earle / Arizona Daily Wildcat 

Meg Peterson, a business management and marketing junior, poses on the catwalk during an environmentally friendly fashion show put on by Students for Sustainability on the UA mall on Monday, April 19. The fashion show was meant to educate the public about sustainability issues.
Lisa Beth Earle
Lisa Beth Earle / Arizona Daily Wildcat Meg Peterson, a business management and marketing junior, poses on the catwalk during an environmentally friendly fashion show put on by Students for Sustainability on the UA mall on Monday, April 19. The fashion show was meant to educate the public about sustainability issues.

More than 20 eco-chic models worked the catwalk during Project Greenway on Monday. The event was hosted on the UA Mall and included a 30-minute fashion show as well as tents in which featured vendors sold various, environmentally-friendly products.

Students for Sustainability, a leadership program through ASUA, planned the event. The group works to implement environmentally friendly practices on campus and found that clothing is an important choice for college students.

“”Clothing is a big thing for our generation,”” said David Schmulenson, a communication sophomore who helped organize the event.

The fashion show included four vendors who were chosen for their sustainable or fair trade practices.

Many of the models sported recycled, brand-name clothing from resale boutiques Buffalo Exchange and Plato’s Closet.

Other outfits utilized organic fabrics or were created by artisans from around the world who are paid a living wage. 

“”Our goal is basically to create awareness in the student body about what they’re wearing,”” Shmulenson said. “”Fashion can look great and still have sustainable practices.””

Students do not always know where their clothing comes from; many products are made in sweatshops or use materials that are harsh on the environment.

“”People asking ‘How it is made?’ is key when buying stuff,”” said Melissa McCormick, co-owner of Toque de Pasión Boutique, a featured vendor. The store exclusively sells organic and fair-trade items.

“”You can get tons of lovely stuff that doesn’t exploit anyone,”” McCormick said.

Kelly Mulholland, owner of Nurturing Nature, another featured vendor, said people want to buy sustainable products and need to know where to find them.

“”There are socially conscious consumers who want to make a difference,”” Mullholand said. “”They need the opportunity to do so.””

Some students who watched the fashion show found that it sparked their interest in eco-fashion.

“”I thought it was clever and really cool,”” said Victoria Tulk, a media arts sophomore. “”It’s fun that it was on campus. It’s different.””

 

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