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The Daily Wildcat

 

Club Spotlight: Society for Creative Anachronism

Kelsee+Becker+%2F++Arizona+Daily+Wildcat%0A%0ABryan+Almond%2C+an+SCA+adviser+known+as+Arion+The+Falcon%2C+duels+Alexander+Farley%2C+a+Aerospace+Engineering+Junior+known+as+Lord+Alejandro.+The+Society+for+Creative+Anachronism+meet+every+Thursday+at+6%3A30pm+at+the+Highland+Commons.+
Kelsee Becker
Kelsee Becker / Arizona Daily Wildcat Bryan Almond, an SCA adviser known as “Arion The Falcon”, duels Alexander Farley, a Aerospace Engineering Junior known as “Lord Alejandro”. The Society for Creative Anachronism meet every Thursday at 6:30pm at the Highland Commons.

A group of students dressed in armored hard suits and fencing may seem unusual in the 21st century, but not for the Society for Creative Anachronism, College of St. Felix UA Chapter.

As a presence on the UA campus for 47 years, the goals of the UA chapter remain the same as the national organization, reenacting culture and traditions of pre-17th century Europe.

“When walking through UA campus you don’t expect to see a group of people with swords in their hands,” said Annika Hernandez, a pre-business management sophomore and vice president of Society for Creative Anachronism.

Curt Booth, club adviser and UA electrical and computer engineering secretary explained that the society is not only a group that meets weekly but a lifestyle, “…an actual culture you immerse yourself in.”

The list of activities that the SCA takes part in are close to endless, according to Booth.

“Whatever personal interest you have, we try our best to incorporate that into our group somehow,” Booth said.

With more than 50 listed activities, students dress in armored combat for fencing as well as archery practice in the Highland Quad area every Thursday night.

Meanwhile, in Highland Commons, a room is reserved for arts and crafts.

“I was here on campus for freshman orientation, just by luck I ended up walking through choir practice, I spoke to a few of the members, by the end of the conversation I was hooked,” Hernandez
said.

The UA chapter consists of about 25 to 30 members. At the end of February members will participate in their largest event titled “War” in Queen Creek, Ariz.

Thousands of people come out to recreate an entire Renaissance atmosphere, he added. Besides the combat fighting and fencing, arts and crafts like calligraphy and glass blowing are highlighted within the event.

Not only does SCA recreate battles and arts, but it is an “Honorary and Chivalry Society” according to Booth.

“What we’re doing is our passion,” Booth said. “Best way to indulge your passion is to share it. Knowledge is power and shared knowledge empowers all.”

If it happened in the medieval time period, SCA can and will recreate it, according to Sara Edwards a junior studying studio art and president of SCA.

“It’s not just for history nerds, the people great and welcoming; it is a huge family,” Edwards said.

SCA meets Thursday nights at the Highland Quad and can also be joined Tuesday nights at Reid Park. The club also hosts archery on Saturdays in various locations.

SCA emphasizes that anyone and everyone with interest is welcome.

“We follow the Golden Rule, and we do not discriminate,” Booth said.

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