The Student News Site of University of Arizona

The Daily Wildcat

61° Tucson, AZ

The Daily Wildcat

The Daily Wildcat

 

1776 copy Declaration of Independence in Tucson

Valentina Martinelli/Arizona Daily Wildcat

Arizona Rangers Vinson Holck, right, and Steve Nekolek stand guard over one of the 26 original first printings by John Dunlap of the Declaration of Independence while displayed in the Arizona History Museum February 21 and 22, 2010.
Valentina Martinelli
Valentina Martinelli/Arizona Daily Wildcat Arizona Rangers Vinson Holck, right, and Steve Nekolek stand guard over one of the 26 original first printings by John Dunlap of the Declaration of Independence while displayed in the Arizona History Museum February 21 and 22, 2010.

One of the few remaining original copies of the Declaration of Independence will be on display today at the Arizona History Museum at 949 E. Second St. from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. The event is free and open to the public. There will also be a video explaining the history and significance of the document and how it furthered America’s quest for independence.

This original copy of the Declaration of Independence, which is one of only 25 remaining, was brought to Tucson through the efforts of the Arizona Historical Society and Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords.

“”The traveling exhibit provides a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to view one of the original Dunlap broadsides, a rare and precious artifact that dates back 234 years and is, in fact, the birth certificate of our nation,”” said Arizona Historical Society Executive Director Anne Woosley.

There were between 100 and 200 poster-sized copies, called broadsides, printed and posted in the main centers of the 13 colonies. The copies were published in John Dunlap’s print shop in Philadelphia on July 4 and 5, 1776.

“”The Declaration of Independence is our nation’s most cherished testament to the value we place on individual liberty,”” Giffords said. “”Southern Arizonans should not miss the opportunity to see this rare document.””

The copy being displayed in Tucson was found by a man in Philadelphia in 1989. He had bought a painting at a flea market for $4. He removed the frame and found the 1776 broadside folded up inside.

Declare Yourself, the National Student/Parent Mock Election and the Pearson Foundation, along with several local businesses and volunteers, helped bring the document to Tucson.

The original Declaration of Independence is housed in the National Archives in Washington, D.C.

More to Discover
Activate Search