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The Daily Wildcat

The Daily Wildcat

 

    Performance: UA presents three nights in the spotlight

    Performance: UA presents three nights in the spotlight

    UA Presents has been busy preparing for three diverse performances this week.

    Beginning tonight, UA Presents will host the first of three exciting events at Centennial Hall until Friday night. Tonight’s performance begins with the dance pieces by Pilobolus. For the past 37 years, Pilobolus has choreographed more than 90 dances that The New York Times has called, “”famous for its wit and sensuality.””

    The group was first founded at Dartmouth College in 1971, and since then, has become an American dance company with great influence around the world. What makes Pilobolus unique to dance is that the dancers are able to transform themselves into different animal forms. By wrapping and unfolding themselves around one another in imaginative ways, the dancers show their athletic abilities and creative collaboration through dance. Pilobolus is returning to Tucson to perform the piece, “”Ocellus,”” but will also be enchanting the audience with a new piece that has yet to be announced.

    Pilobolus will perform tonight, Jan. 28 at 7:30 p.m. in Centennial Hall. Tickets are available for purchase and prices range from $20 to $44 with student, senior, group and military discounts available.

    On Thursday night, UA Presents will host an evening of music by violinist Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg accompanied by pianist Anne-Marie McDermott.

    The evening will be marked by both musicians’ undeniable talent. Salerno-Sonnenberg has been awarded the Naumberg Prize as well as the Avery Fisher Prize. She was also the subject of the 2000 Academy Award-nominated documentary, “”Speaking in String.”” She has been praised by reviewers around the United States for her performance as one of the most talented violinists. The Washington Post wrote, “”Her ability to play even the frailest passages in a way that communicated to the back of the hall set her in the ranks of this century’s greatest violinist.””

    Pianist Anne-Marie McDermott’s playing skills have been praised by The New York Times as “”abundant technical gifts (and) vivid personal connection.”” McDermott has played with Salerno-Sonnenberg regularly, but also plays as a soloist with the New York Philharmonic and orchestras in major cities across the United States.

    Salerno-Sonnenberg and McDermott will appear together in a recital for UA Presents Thursday, Ja. 29 at 7:30 p.m. in Centennial Hall. Tickets are available for purchase with prices ranging from $25 to $60 with student, senior, group and military discounts available.

    This week’s performances will end with the celebration of Blue Note Records 70th Anniversary tour on Friday. Blue Note Records has a lot to celebrate for this anniversary.

    “”It is truly a privilege to be a part of this celebration,”” wrote Lewis Nash, the drummer in Friday’s performance. “”Many of my favorite jazz recordings are on Blue Note, and many jazz legends made their earliest recordings on the label.ÿBeing a part of such a stellar group of musicians is a joy and an honor,”” Nash wrote. Nash was born and raised in South Phoenix and attended ASU. His first Blue Note recording session took place during the mid 1980s.

    The all-star cast consists of musicians Bill Charlap on piano, Ravi Coltrane on tenor saxophone, Nicholas Payton on trumpet, Peter Bernstein on guitar, Steve Wilson on alto saxophone, Lewis Nash on drums and Peter Washington on bass.

    Since 1939, Blue Note Records has been home to many memorable jazz hits. They are the premier and the longest-running label in the history of jazz.

    “”Since the 1930s, this music has been appreciated, admired and enjoyed throughout the world.ÿ It is important, then, for such an integral part of this country’s cultural gift to the world to be presented right here in America; so our own citizens can see and hear the creative, talented musicians who play it,”” Nash wrote.

    “”In my view, all of our performances are equally important to the local communities or institutions in which we’re playing.ÿThe music we play is an original American art form rooted in our shared heritage and history,”” Nash wrote.

    Blue Note’s musical concert will perform tunes by Bud Powell, Horace Silver and Wayne Shorter, to name a few.

    The Blue Note Records 70th Anniversary concert will occur Friday, Jan. 30 at 8 p.m. in Centennial Hall. Tickets are available for purchase with prices ranging from $20 to $44 with student, senior, group and military discounts available.

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