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The Daily Wildcat

The Daily Wildcat

 

    The Written Word

    The Written Word

    Dreams from My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance

    In case you’ve forgotten in the muted months since the presidential election, Barack Obama takes the White House in less than a week. What better way to celebrate than by taking a look at his best-selling books?

    Obama’s first book is a memoir, written before he got started in politics. Published when he was only 33 years old, “”Dreams from My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance”” may seem a little brash, but Obama has a lot to offer. He writes about reconciling with the struggle of growing up as a black American in a white, middle-class household and, as he got older, being overwhelmed as he tried to fit in to black communities and black activism.

    Much of what Obama shares is fascinating, such as his elementary school years spent in Indonesia or his decision to go to Kenya after his father died to visit a family he had never known. The book is littered with interesting anecdotes, the things that forced him to re-evaluate his thinking and his life. Truly, the beauty of this book is the honesty Obama exposes, freely sharing with the American people his beliefs and experiences.

    The Audacity of Hope: Thoughts on Reclaiming the American Dream

    Obama’s second book, “”The Audacity of Hope: Thoughts on Reclaiming the American Dream”” was written just before he began his campaign for the presidency. Despite Obama being far more famous this time around, he still managed to include true tales from his life and some straightforward political talk.

    While it’s true that it’s a lot of liberal dialogue with a few jabs at conservatives, Obama has a pretty insightful view of the political gamut. He talks about the extremes each political party has rushed toward, and how, Republican or Democrat, we’re all still humans who want the same things out of life. He brings up the true values held in America (unrelated to gay marriage, adoption or religion) and a fine appreciation for the Constitution as well as the difficulty of its interpretation.

    Realistically, he sees America as it is and, optimistically, what it one day could be. As open as he was in the first book, Obama continues his heartfelt honesty right up to the last line in ways that could inspire the most pessimistic American to see hope. This guy is leading the country? I feel better already.

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