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The Daily Wildcat

The Daily Wildcat

 

    Valentine’s Day: a time of love and hate

    photo illustration by TAYLOR HOUSE / Arizona Daily Wildcat

Psychology junior Anna Maria DaMommio kisses her boyfriend music sophomore Evan Casler on University Blvd. How couples celebrate the 14th at the UA is varied---some spend the holiday with a significant other while others choose to ignore Valentines Day completely.
    photo illustration by TAYLOR HOUSE / Arizona Daily Wildcat Psychology junior Anna Maria DaMommio kisses her boyfriend music sophomore Evan Casler on University Blvd. How couples celebrate the 14th at the UA is varied—some spend the holiday with a significant other while others choose to ignore Valentine’s Day completely.

    While some students may spend Valentine’s Day in traditional romantic fashion, others have more offbeat plans that include Web cams, cynical attitudes and dragging their unwilling dates to fancy restaurants.

    Pre-business freshman David Kounelis said he will be spending time with his girlfriend tonight to celebrate both the traditional holiday and their one-year anniversary.

    “”(Last year) we went to an Italian restaurant in Scottsdale, so I think we’re going to continue the Italian tradition,”” Kounelis said.

    Jessica Feffer, an undeclared freshman, said she plans to enjoy a three-day vacation to a New Mexico cabin with her boyfriend, where she’ll present him with a “”10 things I love about you”” themed scrapbook as a gift.

    “”We’re going for three days and two nights to see the snow,”” said Feffer.

    Lacey Greer, a pre-physiology freshman, said this will be her first Valentine’s Day “”with a boy,”” and she plans to have a moonlit picnic overlooking the city, which is a significant change from the previous holidays she spent single.

    “”(My friends and I) used to be all depressed and eat lots of food and stuff,”” Greer said.

    Brian Leung, an electrical engineering sophomore, said he is upset about having to celebrate Valentine’s Day because his girlfriend lives in Japan.

    “”I hate it,”” said Leung. “”She’s not here and I can’t do anything.””

    Leung said he’s doing his best to keep the spirit of love alive by mailing her gifts and using an alternative form of communication.

    “”I’m going to sit down and Web-cam with her all night long,”” Leung said.

    Sid Starkman, a pre-physiology freshman, said he doesn’t especially like Valentine’s Day because he doesn’t have a romantic partner to share it with.

    “”I don’t have a girlfriend, so Valentine’s Day doesn’t mean anything to me,”” Starkman said.

    However, he added that his distaste for the holiday would probably only be magnified if he had a significant other.

    “”Actually, if I did have (a girlfriend) I’d be losing hundreds of dollars, so I’d still hate it,”” Starkman said.

    For others, Valentine’s Day is an opportunity to enjoy things they like.

    Stan Molever, a philosophy junior, said he plans on taking advantage of Valentine’s Day as a chance to go to the places he loves and do the things he likes with his girlfriend.

    “”We’re going to Bluepoint (Kitchen and Bar, 2905 E. Skyline Drive,) for dinner because I love it and on Valentine’s Day I make her do what I like,”” Molever said. “”In fact, she doesn’t eat anything there. In fact, she doesn’t even like restaurants.””

    Much like his dinner plans, Molever said he chose gifts for his girlfriend with his own interests in mind.

    “”I’m going to get her some Sega games because I can’t get them for myself,”” Molever said.

    For those without significant others, some are choosing to observe Valentine’s Day with friends and people they love.

    Victoria Cassady said she plans on celebrating by having dinner and drinks with her best friends.

    “”I’d rather be with people I care about, and my friends provide me with all that I need,”” the pre-business sophomore said. “”I think a lot of girls miss the boat and think Valentine’s Day is about a significant other.””

    Danielle Saltzman, who will be joining Cassady for the girls’ night out, agreed that Feb. 14 is a time to remember everyone a person cares for and appreciates.

    “”I don’t feel the pressure on Valentine’s Day that I need to have a date,”” Saltzman said.

    Saltzman said she observed the holiday her own way by sending cards out to family and friends.

    “”It’s about everyone you love,”” Saltzman said.

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