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The Daily Wildcat

The Daily Wildcat

 

Arizona women’s basketball star Whyte expected to be drafted

Tyler+Baker++%2F++Arizona+Daily+Wildcat%0A%0AUA+Womens+Basketball+lost+to+UCLA+69-57%2C+Sunday+afternoon.+
Tyler Baker
Tyler Baker / Arizona Daily Wildcat UA Women’s Basketball lost to UCLA 69-57, Sunday afternoon.

Former Arizona women’s basketball star Davellyn Whyte is expected to hear her name called today in the WNBA Draft.

The draft will start at 5 p.m. on ESPN and then ESPNU will air the second and third rounds starting at 6 p.m. The selection show will also be available on WatchESPN.com and on smartphones and tablets via the WatchESPN app.

The draft will be the first in WNBA history to be televised in prime time, on the East Coast at least.

Whyte scored 2,059 points in her career, behind only Adia Barnes’ 2,237 on the UA scoring list. Whyte and Barnes are the only members of the 2,000 point club in Arizona history.

“I think that she’ll be a great pro player,” said Barnes, a WNBA radio and TV analyst. “I think that she’s really tough to guard, one on one. I think that she has a bright future.”

WNBADraft.net has Whyte going to the Seattle Storm with the 18th pick. CollegeSportsMadness.com has the Indiana Fever picking her with the 21st choice.

Draftsite.com has Whyte going to Los Angeles Sparks in the second round with the 22nd pick.

Whyte scored in double figures in 100 of the 126 games she played in, scored 20 or more 35 times and 30 or more five. Against Arizona State on Feb. 19, the Phoenix native scored 31, grabbed 16 rebounds and had 10 assists, the first triple-double in UA history.

Whyte had 266 steals, second all-time in UA history, was fourth all-time in free throws made, eighth in assists and ninth in rebounding average, with 5.5 per game.

Whyte started every game in her college career and her 4,243 minutes is the most in Wildcat history.

UA head coach Niya Butts thinks Whyte will be even better in the pros because she won’t have to carry so much of the load.

“I think she’ll be even better at the next level,” Butts said. “She sees things before her teammates and when you have a bunch of young athletes ready to do that you get to show what you’re best at.”

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