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The Daily Wildcat

The Daily Wildcat

 

Paul Magloire Jr. ready to do things his way

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Tyler Baker
Arizona safety Paul Magloire Jr. (14) tackles Oregon State wide receiver Xavier Hawkins during Arizona’s 44-7 win on October 10, 2015. Magloire recorded 13 tackles last season.

When Paul Magloire Jr. makes a play against Arizona’s offense in practice, he’s not necessarily loud, but the hybrid linebacker will let the offense know who is top dog.

Magloire especially likes to get in the ear of quarterback Brandon Dawkins.

“I talk trash to Brandon all the time,” Magloire said. “He throws a high ball, I’m talking trash and in his ear. … [If] he gets me one play, he’s going to talk about for two days and if I get him on a play, I’m going to talk about it for an hour because I’m used to those things happening.”

Magloire has absolutely no problem getting in someone’s ear and making his presence felt, which is a trait the junior college transfer didn’t possess last season.

Magloire was recruited as a safety from Arizona Western College in a desert oasis in Yuma. When he arrived in Tucson, he was coming into a new environment and competing against a defensive back core that was already penciled in for the 2015 season.

With trying to get adjusted to a new defensive scheme and having to learn different sets on a dime, Magloire was the quiet guy in the corner just absorbing all of the information.

Now, Magloire is looked at as a leader and the art of trash talking is just another way to keep the team honest and on their toes.

“I feel like I was less talkative, but now everybody is always talking trash to each other, trying to push each other and not in a bad way,” Magloire said.

Injuries plagued the Wildcats in 2015, especially at the linebacker position, losing Scooby Wright III, Derrick Turituri, Cody Ippolito and Jake Matthews.

This led to Magloire transitioning his 215-pound frame to outside linebacker. Magloire finished second on the team in tackles with 72 total, while leading the Wildcats with 54 solo tackles.

“We needed athletic guys at linebacker,” Arizona head coach Rich Rodriguez said. “He filled that role last year and he’ll be better this year.”

The confidence the coaches have in Magloire this offseason reveals their faith in the senior.

Making the transition from playing in space as a defensive back to rushing the edge can present a challenge, but now that Magloire has overcome that hurdle, it gives Rodriguez a playmaker to add into the mix of Arizona’s defense.

“He’s just a really good player and a great guy,” Rodriguez said. “Football is important to him; he’s physical, he’s athletic and he can play multiple positions.”

Rather than learning the X’s and O’s of being a linebacker in the defense, Magloire is focusing on one position: the hybrid player who is able to drop back in coverage while still being able to get to the backfield.

Magloire said he watches practice and game tapes of players like Deone Bucannon of the Arizona Cardinals, another hybrid defensive back who rushes the quarterback. Magloire also studies the 2016 Super Bowl’s Most Valuable Player Von Miller, arguably the NFL’s best pass rusher.

Seeing how those two NFL players have impacted the game with their performance and leadership on the field, Magloire has adopted their techniques to become a vocal and exemplary leader.

“Each position has a leader and has somebody that’s being the vocal guy and is going to get on somebody if they’re slacking on a rep, because you gotta call people if they aren’t doing such,” Magloire said. “You as a leader gotta make sure that you’re not slacking off, cutting reps and what not.”

The game of football, especially on the defensive side of the ball, is evolving into developing more players like Magloire and even though he’s one of few of an up-and-coming breed, his now 225-pound stature and speed is making him a jack of all trades.

“The game is changing and I’m changing with it,” he said. “So I guess things are working out.”


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