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The Daily Wildcat

 

Redesign met with hesitation

Valentina Martinelli/ Arizona Daily Wildcat

Tim Luensman, a engineering freshman speaks with Drew Milson, left, the director of Undergraduate Studies for the physics department and Charles Staflod, an associate professor in the physics department at the Meet Your Major fair in the SUMC Grand Ballroom on Wednesday, Sept 29.
Valentina Martinelli
Valentina Martinelli/ Arizona Daily Wildcat Tim Luensman, a engineering freshman speaks with Drew Milson, left, the director of Undergraduate Studies for the physics department and Charles Staflod, an associate professor in the physics department at the Meet Your Major fair in the SUMC Grand Ballroom on Wednesday, Sept 29.

The Meet Your Major Fair has a new look, but people are divided on whether it’s an improvement.

This year, the fair is organized according to themes, allowing similar majors to be grouped together.

“”I like the diversity of it (the old layout) more. I don’t think we all have to be just college of science,”” said Olivia Hanson, graduate academic advisor for the department of hydrology and water resources. “”Being mixed with others would be fine with me as well because that way kids get a chance to really see the different areas instead of just saying ‘Oh let’s just go to to science’ but if you’ve got science intermixed with arts and all, I think it’s nice.””

The fair was held in the Student Union Memorial Center Grand Ballroom, and each theme was grouped together in its own square of tables.

The fair generally sees 1,000 students and is put on by The Center for Exploratory Students in the College of Letters, Arts & Science.

“”This year, we were very fortunate to receive a Parent and Family Association grant that has enabled us to do more active recruiting,”” said Mika Galilee-Belfer advising specilist in the The Center for Exploratory Students in the College of Letters, Arts & Science.

The grant also allowed them to restructure the fair by theme, Galilee-Belfer said.

“”That option should help students contextualize what the options are. The goal is for students to have an idea of how things are related and what distinct majors have to offer,”” Galilee-Belfer said.

Hanson thought the square formation of the tables left a lot of “”wasted space”” in the middle of the square and pushed the department of hydrology and water resources table away from the center of the room.

“”Not too crazy about the layout because we are kind of hidden back here, but overall it looks like we’ve had a good turnout,”” Hanson said.

Hanson also thought it was strange that some departments didn’t show up, leaving empty tables.

“”I’ve met a lot of high school counselors, which I didn’t know they came to this, and that’s really good because they are taking this information back to their students.””

Candice Curtis, a racetrack industry program senior, runs the Racetrack Industry Program table that now sits among other business related majors, appreciated the reorganization.

“”I think it’s easier for them to find us. I like how the things are kind of grouped together. Last year, I don’t think there was any real structure to how the tables were set up,”” Curtis said.

Many students are surprised to learn what the program involves, according to Curtis.

“”They don’t realize how long it’s been around and just all the different things you can do in horse racing.”” Curtis said. “”It’s not just taking care of the horse.””

Pre-architecture freshman Brittany Porrazzo said she had already found her major but wanted to see what other majors were out there.

“”I just wanted to explore. There’s always that possibility, like what if there was something out there that was just calling my name that I would love that was just tailor made for you,”” Porrazzo said. “”It’s definitely opened my eyes to the different departments in the university.””

Porrazzo thought the themes were convenient and helped students locate a major that was right for them.

“”It’s nice how kind of all the engineering is with engineering, sciences are with sciences,””

Porrazzo said. “”It helps just for the flow and if you know there is something you are definitely not good at — say it was science or math you don’t necessarily have to go towards those things or pass by them. You can just know that’s not for me and kind of continue.””

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