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The Daily Wildcat

The Daily Wildcat

 

    Senior crowned Miss Pima

    Newly crowned Miss Pima County Stephanie Brooks gives her first TV interview after the beautypeagant yesterday at Flowing Wells High School. Brooks, a UA dance senior, also was elected Miss Yuma County in 2005.
    Newly crowned Miss Pima County Stephanie Brooks gives her first TV interview after the beautypeagant yesterday at Flowing Wells High School. Brooks, a UA dance senior, also was elected Miss Yuma County in 2005.

    Six UA students competed in the Miss Pima County Scholarship Pageant yesterday, but only one took home the title.

    Stephanie Brooks, a dance senior, won the crown, receiving a $900 scholarship and paving her way to the Miss America pageant. The contest was held in the auditorium at Flowing Wells High School.

    “”I feel very thankful,”” Brooks said. “”I was a little nervous, but my family has been very supportive.””

    Participants competed in events involving swimsuits, eveningwear, talent displays, interviews and a surprise question. A panel of five judges scored each contestant.

    Current Miss Arizona Nicole Turner was on hand to MC the individual competitions.

    Talent shows ranged from a woman who drew pictures with her feet to a contestant who did a Southern-accented comedic monologue.

    Brooks’ platform was women’s heart disease awareness, an issue that directly affected
    her family.

    Brooks’ grandmother Patty was diagnosed with a 95 percent blockage in one of her arteries in 2005.

    Mrs. Brooks was taken to San Diego, where she underwent five angioplasties in two years.

    “”It’s been a battle my whole family has been dealing with ever since,”” Stephanie Brooks said.

    Brooks said she wanted to raise awareness for a disease that affects one in every 2.5 women, according to the American Heart Association.

    Brooks was also inspired by another woman: former Miss America Heather Whitecomb. The 1995 winner was the first woman with a disability to receive the title.

    “”She was an inspiration and represented what a strong, intelligent and talented woman could be,”” Brooks said. “”Even though she was deaf, it didn’t seem to affect her and she danced beautifully.””

    First runner-up Kyra Batté, a psychology sophomore and recipient of the $150 Quality of life award, said she always dreamed of participating in a beauty pageant.

    “”I’ve been watching Miss America since I was 3 years old. Even when I was young I would

    introduce myself and say ‘Hello, my name is Kyra Batté, future Miss America.””

    The experience helped boost her self-awareness.

    “”You really get to know yourself as you prep for all the interview questions, and I’ve started to watch the news more,”” Batté said. “”It’s a great way to promote whatever you believe in.””

    Aremy Téllez, a pre-physiology freshman, received the $150 talent award prize for her vocal performance of “”Another Victory.”” She said she enjoyed the experience of competing.

    “”You usually think that at pageants all the girls are really mean to each other, but the experience is very fun,”” she said. “”The interviews have helped me prepare for other job interviews and have given me more confidence.””

    For her talent, Brooks danced to the soulful “”Swing Low Sweet Chariot.””

    Awaiting her after the contest were parents Jeanine and Mark, brother Jaysen, roommate Emily Ford and grandmother Patty.

    “”I’m so proud of her,”” Patty said. “”I always knew in my heart she’d win.””

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