ASUA votes no ‘A+’s’

Bethany Barnes

After some debate, the ASUA Senate voted six to four to oppose changes to the undergraduate grading system at its meeting on Wednesday.

The resolution came as a result of the James E. Rogers College of Law requesting the ability to implement a plus and minus grading system, said George Gehrels, a geosciences professor and chair of the UA Undergraduate Council. Gehrels said the college feels its students are at a disadvantage because they are unable to earn “”A plus”” grades.

Gehrels also said he is looking into how other schools such as the University of Michigan, University of California, Los Angeles, and University of California, Berkeley, utilize similar systems.

The Associated Students of the University of Arizona sought out feedback from students on changing to a plus and minus grading system, and the majority of feedback received was negative.

Sen. Chad Travis said that his high school used a plus and minus grading system, and he thought it added undue pressure.

“”Grades aren’t the only facet of college,”” Travis said.

According to Gehrels, the earliest a plus and minus system could be put in place would be the fall 2012 semester.

“”I think this is a really premature time to take a stance on a plus or minus grading system,”” said Sen. Scott Rising, who described passing a resolution on the system when it has yet to be fleshed out as a “”knee jerk”” reaction.

Sen. Mary Myles said that if the Undergraduate Council knows this kind of system is something ASUA is against, then the council does not need to waste time hashing out the details of a new system students are against.

Sen. Dominick San Angelo said the point of the resolution was to state that the senate does not want something changed if there is not a problem with it.  

“”I’ve never heard of any students that have written to me, contacted me upset because ‘gosh I can’t get a plus or minus grade,'”” he said.