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The Daily Wildcat

The Daily Wildcat

 

    Men unite to prevent violence

    Mary Koss, a regents professor of psychology, psychiatry and family and community medicine, reviews two videos, American Porn and The Girl Next Door, yesterday afternoon. She uses both documentaries, which discuss the world of porn, in her classes on domestic violence, particularly violence against women. October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month.
    Mary Koss, a regent’s professor of psychology, psychiatry and family and community medicine, reviews two videos, ‘American Porn’ and ‘The Girl Next Door,’ yesterday afternoon. She uses both documentaries, which discuss the world of porn, in her classes on domestic violence, particularly violence against women. October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month.

    A new Tucson men’s anti-violence group is working toward ending domestic violence, as organizations across the nation participate in Domestic Violence Awareness Month this October.

    In an effort to raise community awareness and conduct community education, the Southern Arizona Center Against Sexual Assault started a program in April called the Men’s Anti-Violence Partnership.

    The group has more than 60 prominent founding members, including UA football head coach Mike Stoops and men’s basketball head coach Lute Olson, UA Director of Athletics Jim Livengood, Tucson Mayor Bob Walkup, Pima County Board of Supervisors Chair Richard Elias, Tucson Police Chief Richard Miranda and businessman Jim Click.

    “”Since most domestic violence is done by men – from 95 to 98 percent – the goal for the partnership is to end violence against women,”” said SACASA spokesman Michael Mandel.

    Livengood said he is passionate about the partnership’s cause.

    “”We can’t stress enough how at an early age this needs to be taught.””

    – Jim Livengood,
    athletic director

    “”This is a message we have to get out there,”” Livengood said. “”Nothing good is going to happen unless we can promote this message and be examples of what we are saying.””

    Domestic violence is an epidemic affecting Americans in all communities, regardless of age, race, ethnicity, religion, nationality, economic status or sexual orientation, Walkup said in a proclamation about Domestic Violence Awareness month.

    TPD Sgt. Dennise Wilson, who works specifically in the area of domestic violence, said statistics show reports of domestic violence in Tucson are declining.

    There were 9,603 reported cases of domestic violence in 2004. That number fell to 9,427 cases in 2005, a drop of 1.8 percent, Wilson said.

    However, Wilson also suggested the figure may not reflect reality because there are many factors that can cause people not to report a domestic violence crime.

    “”They might fear that they will make the person angrier in a relationship, and they feel there is no way out or they don’t have the finances to get away,”” Wilson said.

    Mandel said crime reports often don’t state what is really going on because the reporting rate for those crimes are low.

    But education, prevention and intervention efforts will increase public awareness to confront the abuse of power and control in relationships, Walkup said in his proclamation.

    The partnership is holding an award ceremony Nov. 5 to honor 10 members of the community who have made contributions and educated the community about violence, Mandel said.

    Mary Koss, a UA regents professor of psychology, psychiatry, and family and community medicine, will receive the award for outstanding educator.

    “”It is very important to get men involved in the prevention of sexual violence,”” Koss said. “”Men are more effective at talking to men about it. They’re the only ones who can stop it.””

    Livengood said education must begin early to be effective in the next generation.

    “”We can’t stress enough how at an early age this needs to be taught,”” he said.

    The Tucson Police Department’s domestic violence unit is targeting the same group for education, Wilson said.

    “”Children who grow up in a violent home see it around them every day,”” Wilson said. “”They don’t know that it is wrong, so they grow up and take on the same mannerisms.””

    For 2006 through the end of September, TPD has had 5,414 cases of domestic violence, compared to 5,563 cases at the end of September 2005.

    The 2.68 percent drop is encouraging, Wilson said.

    The UA offers a better range of services than other universities, including the OASIS Program for Sexual Assault and Relationship Violence, RESTORE Restorative Justice for Sex Offences, a required presentation during freshman orientation and a strict conduct code concerning rape against women, Koss said.

    But Koss said it’s still not enough.

    “”There is no reason to believe that the numbers at the UA differ from the university national average that one in every five women are raped or attempted raped in an academic year,”” Koss said. “”We need to do more.””

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