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The Daily Wildcat

The Daily Wildcat

 

    Martians land at science library

    This exhibit in the Science and Engineering Library celebrates the lasting fictional and cultural importance of the planet Mars. Local interest in the Red Planet has skyrocketed since the UAs Mars Lander touched down on Martian soil.
    This exhibit in the Science and Engineering Library celebrates the lasting fictional and cultural importance of the planet Mars. Local interest in the Red Planet has skyrocketed since the UA’s Mars Lander touched down on Martian soil.

    Mars is the buzzword this month as the UA’s Mars Lander is helping the world to better understand the Red Planet. The Science and Engineering Library has a lo-fi display up that is stocked with popular Mars-related paraphernalia, including books and action figures.

    The books are from the Libraries Special Collection of Twentieth Century Science Fiction Genre fiction and they’ve come out of hiding for this display, which will be up until Sept. 12.

    Pulp novels by “”Tarzan”” creator Edgar Rice Burroughs litter the shelves, such as “”Nuvia: Maid of Mars”” and “”The Gods of Mars,”” which features a ripped twenty-something in red shorts who looks like he should be in Baywatch, grasping for dear life onto a spaceship.

    Other works that exemplify having too much time on one’s hands include technical manuals about how to man a spaceship to Mars.

    Perhaps the most interesting specimens in this display are the toys. Marvin the Martian has a conversation with Martian Manhunter, a founding member of the Justice League who has graced such television shows as Smallville.

    The exhibit also takes into account more modern representations of Martians with their Planet Heroes toy. Planet Heroes are a line of toys by Fisher-Price created to represent the planets in our solar system. Of course, Mars is the one featured in the display.

    This Mars “”Digger”” comes with his own rubble rover. The box describes Mars as “”A rocky surface with volcanoes, lava plains and remnants of landslides,”” adding that “”a year on Mars lasts 687 Earth days!””

    With a photo of one of the earliest alien action figures (not much has changed in our interpretation of aliens) and classic Martian novels like Ray Bradbury’s “”The Martian Chronicles,”” the display is worth checking out on the second level of the Science and Engineering Library.

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