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The Daily Wildcat

The Daily Wildcat

 

    Dynamic dancers take the stage

    Courtesy+of+Michel+Cavalca+
    michel cavalca
    Courtesy of Michel Cavalca

    Diego White began his career dancing “funk” for change on the streets of Paris. As of today, he has traveled to 47 different countries and danced in front of more than a million people with the dance troupe Compagnie Käfig, which will be at Centennial Hall on Saturday at 8 p.m.
    White, along with 10 other street dancers from Rio de Janeiro, make up the eclectic and unique group that is Compagnie Käfig. The dancers are said to color the stage with an exhilarating mix of hip-hop, acrobatics and traditional dances such as samba and capoeira. “The 11 dancers commit themselves totally, energetically, joyfully. Absolutely irresistible,” French magazine Le Figaro wrote about the troupe.
    “The first thing that they try to show is their energy and their pleasure to be on stage dancing,” White said in his native tongue, Portuguese, to the Daily Wildcat through his translator, Astrid Teledo. Being on stage “represents a moment of pleasure and joy and happiness because it allows him to do what he loves,” White said.
    Artistic Director Mourad Merzouki found inspiration for the two shows that will be performed at Centennial Hall within the personal histories of his dancers. All hailing from favelas, or shanty towns in Brazil, their passion for life and success resonated with Merzouki. The first act, Correria, captures the frantic race that humans partake in to get to the top. The second act, Agwa, is about water, the key to our survival and our most precious resource.
    According to White, every member in Compagnie Käfig is both a dancer and a choreographer. Merzouki allows for each dancer to cultivate his own unique style and to collaborate in composing the dances.
    “There are different dynamics of each dancer; each dancer dances individually,” White said. “They each have their own very different individuality within the group.”
    Though the dances that are being performed on Saturday were choreographed by Merzouki and inspired by the dancers’ roots, White said that, normally, the inspiration for their explosive movement comes from the music. His personal favorite is house music, though their Tucson performance will feature a variety of different sounds and melodies from various regions all over the globe.
    Their costumes are minimalistic, but the dance troupe does not need flashy garb to attract attention. They let their youthful vigor, distinctive movement and synergetic devotion speak for them.
    “[We want] to give energy to the people,” White said, “and he hopes that the public can receive it. He hopes to change people’s energies and make people happier and more positive.”

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