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The Daily Wildcat

The Daily Wildcat

 

    UA Minute in History: McKale Center

    You may spend a lot of time watching games in McKale Center, but how much do you really know about its history? Find out with Daily Wildcat Investigative Editor Alana Minkler in this UA Minute in History.

Video by Alec White, Nicholas Trujillo and Alana Minkler
Music Credit: Bensound Summer
    You may spend a lot of time watching games in McKale Center, but how much do you really know about its history? Find out with Daily Wildcat Investigative Editor Alana Minkler in this UA Minute in History. Video by Alec White, Nicholas Trujillo and Alana Minkler Music Credit: Bensound “Summer”

    I’m Alana Minkler and welcome to this UA Minute in History. Today we are at the most well-known athletic arena in the Pac-12: McKale Center. While famously known as the home of UA men’s basketball, it also houses an important part of UA culture. 

    At a cost of $8.1 million, the McKale Center opened in 1973 and is named after James Fred “Pop” McKale. You can see a mural of him in the Hall of Champions. 

    The Hall of Champions opened in the Fall of 2003 and hosts a rotating display of legends inside. Through the doors of the Hall of Champions you can see the court in full view. 

    In 2001 it was named the Lute and Bobbi Olsen Court in recognition of the couples’ impact on the University and Tucson community. 

    In 2014, renovations started on installing a new, four-sided scoreboard, and video replay screens, along with renovations on the seating, playing floor, and more. 

    Every year, fans are treated to watching elite UA athletes perform, including UA’s first No. 1 NBA Draft pick DeAndre Ayton. 

    Not only does McKale host basketball, it hosts volleyball, women’s basketball, and gymnastics. 

    Next time you’re on campus, stop by the McKale Center. You never know what new things you’ll learn about UA athletics. Thanks for watching this UA Minute in History, I’m Alana Minkler. 


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