The Student News Site of University of Arizona

The Daily Wildcat

80° Tucson, AZ

The Daily Wildcat

The Daily Wildcat

 

Group wants to amend Constitution

Valentina Martinelli / Arizona Daily Wildcat

 David Cobb, former 2004 green party nominee for US President and american activist, spoke at the James E. Rogers Law School on April 13, 2010. His lecture encourages Americans to take advantage of their constitutional rights and have more say in their governments and the laws they pass.
Valentina Martinelli
Valentina Martinelli / Arizona Daily Wildcat David Cobb, former 2004 green party nominee for US President and american activist, spoke at the James E. Rogers Law School on April 13, 2010. His lecture encourages Americans to take advantage of their constitutional rights and have more say in their governments and the laws they pass.

David Cobb, the 2004 Green Party presidential candidate, gave a presentation at the UA Law School on April 13 describing why citizens should be working towards amending the Constitution.

“”I am a proud, patriotic and pissed off American,”” Cobb said.

Cobb’s talk challenged the audience to answer a specific question: Should corporations have the same rights as individual citizens?

The Supreme Court ruled in Citizens United v. the Federal Election Commission that corporations could use money to support or oppose election candidates.

“”Corporations have assumed the rights of people. They have taken human beings rights, used them and have caused them to become undemocratic,”” said CJ Jones, the event coordinator. “”Is that where we want the country to go, and, if not, what do we do about it? The answer is a constitutional amendment.””

He defends his statement that corporations should not obtain rights by asking the audience how many times the word people is stated in the constitution compared to the number of times corporations is stated.

Cobb expressed the need to re-evaluate the country’s democracy and the laws upon which the nation was built.

He deconstructed the word democracy to its Greek origin, demo-kratia, which means the people rule.

“”At the end of the day, we are supposed to be in a democracy,”” Cobb said.

Many legislators are opposed the ruling as well.

“”I disagree with the decision of the Supreme Court,”” said Rep. Daniel Patterson, D-Tucson.

Patterson supports House Bill 2788, which states that no corporations may contribute money to a candidate’s campaign.

The talk was sponsored by local chapters of the Alliance for Democracy, Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom, Democracy for America and the Student Chapter of the American Constitution Society.

“”Our members are more than welcome to believe in what they want to believe in,”” said Phil Daniels, vice president of the student chapter of the American Constitution Society and is a first year law student.

Cobb was chosen to speak at the UA Law School because of his knowledge and involvement in the case.

“”People need to become aware of how powerful corporations are in the United States,”” Jones said. “”They’ve gotten this power through manipulation of the court systems.””

Cobb ended his speech by encouraging the people in his audience to voice their opinions.

“”Let’s get off our knees, stand up and act like the proud, pissed off Americans that we are. Peace.””

 

More to Discover
Activate Search