The Student News Site of University of Arizona

The Daily Wildcat

50° Tucson, AZ

The Daily Wildcat

The Daily Wildcat

 

    ‘Snowbound’ a refreshing exhibition

    Mike Christy / Arizona Daily Wildcat

Herb Stratford, pointing at right, and 13-year-old Matthew Satori, discuss a photograph last Friday from Lisa M. Robinsons Snowbound photography series on display at the Temple Gallery on South Scott Avenue in downtown. The series will be available for viewing until February 23.
    Mike Christy
    Mike Christy / Arizona Daily Wildcat Herb Stratford, pointing at right, and 13-year-old Matthew Satori, discuss a photograph last Friday from Lisa M. Robinson’s “Snowbound” photography series on display at the Temple Gallery on South Scott Avenue in downtown. The series will be available for viewing until February 23.

    Last week’s rain and fluctuating temperatures were no fun. But when the tops of the Catalina Mountains were dusted with white, it was a sight to see — snow in Tucson. Thankfully, you no longer need to drive all the way up to Summerhaven to see some flurries.

    Instead, climb up the stairs of the Temple of Music & Art and visit the Temple Gallery’s newest exhibition, where dark wooden benches invite you to focus on the photographs. Examine and enjoy Lisa M. Robinson’s “”Snowbound”” series, which opened last Friday.

    Every picture is a powerful shot of snow or ice worthy of a “”National Geographic”” spread. The works are starkly white, but not barren. Some are elemental photos of snow banks juxtaposed against a tempest of roiling navy clouds, while others are pictures of a snow-laden trampoline and hammock. Dramatic frozen statues become angry pillars defiant of the sky, while solid waterfalls are transformed into willowy fingers gently brushing the earth.

    On the surface, the pictures have a calming and cleansing effect, where the snow softly obliterates and blurs jagged edges. Yet there is an underlying tension as the photos stratify into natural and man-made creations. Places such as tree houses and shacks are blatantly palpable in comparison to evergreens and peaks. Robinson channels this tension between the artificial and natural world through her attempt to capture a “”human reference or human element without a human presence.””

    For instance, one of her earliest works titled “”Running Fence”” is a serene landscape of a snow-covered hill, jarringly interrupted by a garish orange construction fence that stretches into the distance. Mere mortal metal stakes pierce the cold ground, stabbing and defining the scenery. Robinson explains that, upon seeing that empty field with the fence, it “”called up in me a feeling of ecstasy or joy or beauty. I wanted to explore it more.”” And that’s how “”Snowbound”” began.

    “”I think the pictures speak for themselves,”” said Terry Etherton, owner of the Etherton Gallery, which manages the space. “”They’re so elegant and beautiful and understated and almost ethereal.”” A long-time admirer of Robinson’s work, this is the first time Etherton is showcasing the “”Snowbound”” series. Hannah Glasston, who has been with the Etherton Gallery for seven years, believes the photographs examine “”a person’s position in the landscape and what happens as things change over time, as ice changes to water.””

    The Temple Gallery hosts around six shows each year, coinciding with every new play at the Arizona Theatre Company. Robinson’s series will run until Feb. 23, so step in and cool off while you can.

     

    More to Discover
    Activate Search