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The Daily Wildcat

The Daily Wildcat

 

    Students bring back elementary tradition

    Media arts junior Jeff Rutledge stands in front of a foursquare game yesterday afternoon he helped to create at the Alumni Plaza. Games are held in front of the Administration building every Tuesday and Thursday at 1 p.m.
    Media arts junior Jeff Rutledge stands in front of a foursquare game yesterday afternoon he helped to create at the Alumni Plaza. Games are held in front of the Administration building every Tuesday and Thursday at 1 p.m.

    In the shadows of the Administration building, under the astute eyes of seven floors of the university’s most influential leaders, a group of students has gathered to start a tradition that has been lost for many years.

    With a roll of blue tape in hand, Jeff Rutledge leads the small crowd of about 15 people every week to the flagstone expanse of the Alumni Plaza, just east of the fountains, right at the foot of the steps leading to the Administration building.

    They are here to play foursquare.

    “”This isn’t your average elementary school foursquare,”” said Kara Cooper, a history senior, as she waited in line to go back into the foray. “”We are slamming the ball down people’s throats. We’re out for blood.””

    Rutledge, a media arts junior, began the biweekly event about a month ago.

    “”I remember foursquare being really fun as a kid,”” Rutledge said. “”This time it’s different. It’s very… vicious and ruthless.””

    The rebirth of the elementary school game takes place every Tuesday and Thursday at 1 p.m., one of the busiest times for pedestrian traffic around the Student Union Memorial Center.

    Many onlookers can be seen watching the flurry of activity around the blue square with a mixture of skepticism and nostalgia.

    Some join the back of the line, and others walk past smiling.

    “”I haven’t played foursquare since like fourth or fifth grade,”” said Angela Davidson, a pre-nursing freshman.

    Rutledge said his organization of the game is informal – he just shows up and tapes out the lines, and people start to come.

    “”I didn’t really ask if we could do this; I kind of just set up and play,”” he said. “”No negative feedback yet.””

    Diane Newman, program coordinator for procurement and contracting services, who has seen the group playing, said the students don’t need a permit to use the space. The only time they would be asked to move is if there were an event reserved for the same spot.

    “”They’re just out there recreating, like the people on the grass throwing Frisbees,”” Newman said. “”It’s harmless fun.””

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