The Student News Site of University of Arizona

The Daily Wildcat

100° Tucson, AZ

The Daily Wildcat

The Daily Wildcat

 

    Designer and sister duo showcases fashion line

    Rebecca+Marie+Sasnett%2F+The+Daily+Wildcat%0A%0ALocal+designers+Laurel+Burton%2C+27%2C+and+Mariko+Burton%2C+30%2C+sell+their+clothing+line+on+University+Blvd+in+front+of+Swindlers+clothing+store+Wednesday.+Laurel+and+Mariko+Burton+have+been+co-designing+for+four+years.%0A%0A%0A
    Rebecca Marie Sasnett
    Rebecca Marie Sasnett/ The Daily Wildcat Local designers Laurel Burton, 27, and Mariko Burton, 30, sell their clothing line on University Blvd in front of Swindlers clothing store Wednesday. Laurel and Mariko Burton have been co-designing for four years.

    Fashion designers and sisters showcased their unique designs at a pop-up trunk show outside Swindlers on University Boulevard on Wednesday.
    Their collection, called Kuzu, reflects their passion for handcrafted garments. Designers Laurel Burton and Mariko Burton, who taught themselves how to sew, have their own unique and individual styles that are not only displayed by the way they dress, but also expressed in the pieces they create.
    At 16, Laurel Burton started sewing her own clothes with her grandmother’s old sewing machine, and she still makes pieces by hand. She showcases her girly-girl style through the use of prints, patterns and bows, creating a vintage 1950s vibe. Pieces she finds in thrift stores around Tucson serve as a sources of inspiration, she said.
    Mariko Burton gravitates toward more neutral tones for her designs. Designers and European fashionistas, such as Ann Demeulemeester and Alexander McQueen, ultimately motivated her to pick up sewing at the age of 20.
    The earrings and pants Laurel Burton wore to the Kuzu pop-up event were both handmade by her sister.
    “Our styles complement each other,” Laurel Burton said, “but are very different.”
    Nowadays, a high demand for trendy clothes has consumers quickly buying items from stores like Forever 21 and H&M. The poor quality of these pieces is a consequence of their mass production — unlike the clothes the sisters make. The two designers pay attention to the details of every stitch, Mariko Burton said.
    This “slow fashion” is a key idea among designers like Laurel Burton and Mariko Burton, who stand against the mass-produced garments churned out by large clothing companies.
    “[Fast fashion is] resulting in people losing appreciation for the art of making the garments,” Laurel Burton said.
    But the sisters keep their sights set on creating high quality clothing.
    “[A lot of] attention goes into finishing the item and making sure everything is held together properly,” Mariko Burton said.

    More to Discover
    Activate Search