The Student News Site of University of Arizona

The Daily Wildcat

Tucson, AZ

The Daily Wildcat

The Daily Wildcat

 

    Tech fee may see $50 rise for next year

    Sergio Valencia, a junior majoring in business management and Spanish, downloads practice sheets for a class using the UA WiFi network yesterday in the Manuel T. Pacheco Integrated Learning Center. The campuswide wireless network was funded in part by a $50 technology fee added to tuition.
    Sergio Valencia, a junior majoring in business management and Spanish, downloads practice sheets for a class using the UA WiFi network yesterday in the Manuel T. Pacheco Integrated Learning Center. The campuswide wireless network was funded in part by a $50 technology fee added to tuition.

    The Center for Computing and Information Technology will request an additional $50 to be tacked on to the student technology fee that would give the UA’s computer network $100 per student to work with next year, according to CCIT officials.

    This year’s UA WiFi program was funded in part by a $65 student technology fee that was added to student tuition for the coming school year. Of the fee, $50 was given to CCIT to fund the computer network.

    Bob Lancaster, co-director of CCIT, said students will have UA WiFi access in the Main Library, Science-Engineering Library, Student Union Memorial Center and Park Student Union and parts of the UA Mall today.

    Now that UA WiFi is available campuswide, a fee increase for next year is not necessary, said Paul Thorn, president of the Graduate and Professional Student Council.

    Thorn said the money should be used in different areas of the budget in order to benefit graduate and undergraduate students.

    “”We discussed it last year, and the GPSC supported the $15 library fee, not the $50 technology fee,”” Thorn said. “”I think there is a priority for undergraduates to have class availability.””

    Thorn said many graduate students already have access where they use their laptops.

    “”The College of Law is already wired. McClelland (Hall) is wireless already,”” Thorn said.

    Lancaster said his office hasn’t received any complaints yet about the WiFi student fee.

    “”Most people we talk to are excited to see technology come onto campus,”” Lancaster said. “”It is just a technology fee, so wireless is just the first step we are taking.””

    With the 15 percent for financial aid and a 10 percent reserve in case of lower-than-expected enrollment taken out of the $50 fee, Lancaster said only $38 is currently being used to fund the UA WiFi program.

    Jessica Anderson, a pre-business junior and Associated Students of the University of Arizona senator, said there haven’t been many student complaints because getting wireless accessibility was such a prominent issue.

    “”We see a lot of benefit besides the personal side, which is wireless access,”” Anderson said. “”It will benefit our university as one of the Pac-10 universities. Because we didn’t have wireless Internet, I think we got more complaints.””

    Anderson also said the tuition raise isn’t really a problem because of the way student fees are dealt with.

    “”Every time there is a new student fee, the UA makes an effort to boost financial aid,”” Anderson said. “”Every time you raise tuition, there are students who have conflict.””

    Mandy Andres, a nutritional science junior, said she doesn’t use the wireless that is available on campus because she doesn’t bring her laptop to the UA.

    “”My laptop is too big,”” Andres said. “”The fee kind of sucks, but I guess I should use wireless now.””

    Colin Miller, an engineering freshman, said he bought his laptop because he heard that the UA campus provided wireless access.

    “”I think it’s worth it,”” Miller said. “”I don’t think it’s fair for other students who don’t use it to be charged.””

    More to Discover
    Activate Search