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The Daily Wildcat

The Daily Wildcat

 

    “Election rewards old, new”

    Kenny Ho, center, a pre-business freshman, beckons Hinibar Ghout, right, a chemical engineering junior, to vote in the ASUA general election yesterday, while Derek Teigen, left, a regional  development senior, votes for his preferred candidates.
    Kenny Ho, center, a pre-business freshman, beckons Hinibar Ghout, right, a chemical engineering junior, to vote in the ASUA general election yesterday, while Derek Teigen, left, a regional development senior, votes for his preferred candidates.

    More than 3,500 voters had their voices heard in this year’s ASUA general election, which vaulted fresh faces into the limelight and emboldened established candidates last night.

    Running unopposed, Tommy Bruce remained as president of the Associated Students of the University of Arizona. He officially becomes the first two-term leader in the history of the governing body.

    “”You can just expect that upward momentum that we started this year,”” Bruce said. “”We’ve come a long way from our most recent past, and I guarantee you, as a second-term president, you will see a lot out of ASUA.””

    Jessica Anderson soundly defeated Chasen Tyler Moses for executive vice president, while Seema Patel edged out James Pennington-McQueen for administrative vice president.

    Set to join Bruce as a second-year veteran in her position, Anderson plans to use her time to refine club funding and create more outside fundraisers, measures vital to ASUA and the UA campus, she said.

    “”These are things I’ve strived for all year long,”” said Anderson, who received more than 72 percent of the vote. “”Now we can finally get to work on that.””

    A tight race for administrative vice president showed Patel just how much she and Pennington-McQueen had fought for the position, she said.

    “”I have fought for this so hard,”” said Patel, who received 53 percent of the vote. “”We really got the students excited to vote.””

    To show her appreciation for the close win, Patel plans to stay true to her platform by creating ties with university administrators and increasing communication among campus organizations, she said.

    “”We’re going to get started right away,”” she said.

    After neglecting to attend yesterday’s ASUA Senate meeting in order to campaign, Pennington-McQueen left the Student Union Memorial Center’s Kiva Room quickly after the results were revealed last night.

    In a perennially close senatorial race, the elected candidates were separated by less than two percent of the vote.

    The leading vote-getter, Gabby Ziccarelli (8.96 percent), edged out Emily Fritze by eight votes.

    Nick Macchiaroli (7.24 percent) received the 10th and final Senate slot, winning by 16 votes over Michaela Davison.

    The other new senators elected, in order of votes received, were Rosie Reid-Correa, Jason E. Mighdoll, Jimmy MacKenzie, Kayla Patrick, Bryan Baker, Stephen Wallace and Matthew Ellis.

    Samantha Morriss (6.77 percent) and Jacob Schmidt (6.56) also failed to gain enough votes.

    “”Everyone had generally amazing platforms,”” Ziccarelli said. “”I’m just very grateful.””

    While new blood will bring change to ASUA, that change will result in a more student-interactive organization, Mighdoll said.

    “”We really have a chance to prove ourselves,”” he said. “”What is going to change will change for the better.””

    The emotion and drama of the night was not lost on KAMP Student Radio general manager Karl Goranowski, who shrieked, leapt into the air and embraced colleagues when it was announced students had passed a $1 per-semester activity fee to essentially keep the station alive.

    The fee referendum passed with more than 63 percent of the vote, giving KAMP a consistent sourcing of funding for the next four years.

    If the vote had gone against the station, KAMP would have been forced to take on club status and search for new facilities, a situation that would have crippled the organization, Goranowski said.

    “”It wouldn’t have killed KAMP,”” he said. “”But it definitely would have put it on life support.””

    A referendum to add $1 to the Arizona Students’ Association’s $1 per-semester fee passed with more than 66 percent of the vote.

    The result secures ASA’s spot as an independent, student-funded organization serving as the voice of the students, said Michael Slugocki, vice chair for ASA.

    “”We want to continue to raise the main issues and expand our outreach,”” he said. “”We’re hoping to bring the students more into the conversation.””

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