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The Daily Wildcat

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The Daily Wildcat

The Daily Wildcat

 

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    Dear Editor,

    The cost of textbooks is at an extreme high and only keeps rising. It has every college student concerned and no resolution seems to be taking place.

    The high cost of textbooks is another added stress to the already demanding environment students are in with having to pay for tuition, housing, food, other miscellaneous costs. While classes require certain textbooks for course material, students are obligated to buy the newest version of the exact same textbook. Many times the only difference between the 2008 and 2013 version of the textbook is that there is a new introduction or a forward added.

    Our teachers and administration need to realize the destitution this has on student’s pockets and resolve this by using the website Open Source. Open Source works to help the cost of textbooks stay low by giving publishers the option to make their textbook available online, which lowers the cost for students and the publisher.

    This in return makes other publishers have to complete with the lower prices, and thus they lower their prices. Open Source works with students, authors and publishers alike, making the textbook process a more simple and affordable one.

    All teachers and publishers should invest in Open Source, because it is a new and great opportunity for publishers to make new revenue and provide low costs for students.

    Sincerely,

    Briana Binder
    University of Arizona Student, ASA

    In response to “Arizona Board of Regents passes 3 percent tuition hike for UA” (by Alison Dorf and Ryan Revock, April 4):

    As a grad student with 20 hours contract, tuition does not affect me; but why is the library fee increased? I seldom borrow books. I use computers a lot, but the new dual screens are not utilized by many users.

    — Sunny Boy

    In response to “Pac-12 Network review: new channel holds up well” (by James Kelley, April 5):

    The problem is entirely with DirecTV. They have been offered the same deal as all of the other carriers and have rejected it, as if they’ve done something to deserve special treatment. Larry Scott has done nothing wrong with regards to DTV. If you have DTV and want the Pac-12 Network, then change providers or demand that the executives at DTV stop acting like petulant children.

    — Kevin Wos

    In response to “For the sake of the Pac-12’s integrity, Ed Rush needs to be fired” (by Zack Rosenblatt, April 4):

    Wow … this says much more than it’s really saying. Arizona was controlled by the refs this season.

    — James

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