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The Daily Wildcat

The Daily Wildcat

 

    Dance students get ‘In the Season’

    Erich Healy  / Arizona Daily Wildcat

A selection of damaged books found on shelves throughout the UA Main Library include offensive hand-written phrases. The books were pulled from the shelves and are no longer available for check out.
    Erich Healy
    Erich Healy / Arizona Daily Wildcat A selection of damaged books found on shelves throughout the UA Main Library include offensive hand-written phrases. The books were pulled from the shelves and are no longer available for check out.

    It’s that time of year again. The temperature is dropping, radio stations are streaming carols, and red and white Starbucks holiday cups can be seen all over campus. Yes, everyone is getting into the holiday spirit. However, for the UA School of Dance, the end of the semester holds an even greater perk: the school’s annual Student Spotlight performance, “”In the Season.””

    A performance comprised solely of undergraduate and graduate student choreographed works, “”In the Season”” gives UA Dance students a chance to flex their choreographic muscles. However, with only a limited amount of slots available in the concert’s program, student choreographers must audition their works in front of a panel of faculty judges. Only those that inspire the most excitement and praise from the judges make the cut.  

    With its diverse and creative program, spanning a wide range of styles and energies, “”In the Season”” is known for being an audience favorite, as well as a favorite among the dancers. Choreographers Erik Ostrand, a junior in the program, and Torri Kreinheder, a senior in the program, shared their enthusiasm for being among the few selected to showcase their work in this weekend’s show.

    What first inspired you to choreograph a piece for the show?

    Kreinheder: Well, I had to make a dance for my choreography class, and I meant to do a duet, but it ended up being just me and my two friends. I really liked how it turned out, so I decided to show it (at the audition), and it ended up being in the show.

    How many people auditioned pieces for the show?

    Ostrand: I think there were 45 pieces that auditioned, but only 12 made it into the show.

    Wow, so how does it feel being one of those 12?

    Kreinheder: It feels really good. (Laughs) I’m really excited. It was unexpected.

    Ostrand: It was definitely an honor to get in the show because it was the first time I auditioned a piece, and consequently, my first piece in the show.

    How long did you work on choreographing your piece? Was it a pretty long process?

    Kreinheder: Well, I didn’t really have that long. We only had a few rehearsals, I think about four hour-long rehearsals to finish it and put it all together. It’s three minutes long.

    Ostrand: I’ve been working on this piece for most of the semester. It’s titled “”Open Fields,”” and it’s the longest and largest piece in the show. It’s about 7 minutes and has 28 dancers.

    How would you describe your dance? What style is it?

    Kreinheder: I would say that it’s contemporary ballet … ish. It’s to a song called “”The English Mail Coach.”” It’s like this constantly beating bell sound, so (the movement) goes perfectly to the music.

    Ostrand: I’m not really sure how to describe it. I guess it falls in the realm of contemporary dance. But it uses really simple and almost minimalist movement, and just explores what it’s like to have that many people on stage at the same time, without anyone leaving. It’s constantly 28 people on stage.

    What makes “”In the Season”” such a must-see show?

    Kreinheder: Well, it’s by students, so that makes it really fun and unique.

    Ostrand: Yeah, it’s work by peers, and it’s all new work, too. So you’re not seeing something that’s really been done before. I know some people dread coming to dance shows because they think they’re going to see something outdated, something old. But everything’s new, and everything’s extremely different. So, it should be a fun show.

     

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