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The Daily Wildcat

The Daily Wildcat

 

    Charity haircuts net 500 inches for kids

    Claire C. Laurence/ Arizona Daily Wildcat

Students donated hair yesterday at the Great Clips Hair Salon at the Student Union Memorial Center.
    Claire C. Laurence/ Arizona Daily Wildcat Students donated hair yesterday at the Great Clips Hair Salon at the Student Union Memorial Center.

    Locks for love

    Sandy Treadwell, a nature photographer and history archivist, has been waiting two years to cut off her hair.

    Treadwell said she grew out her normally short locks after seeing TV shows about Locks of Love, an organization that provides hairpieces to financially disadvantaged children under 18 with long-term medical hair loss.

    Yesterday an event sponsored by the Hillel Center and Great Clips offered free haircuts to anyone with 10 inches of hair to spare, with all proceeds going straight to Locks of Love.

    More than 500 inches of hair were cut off, and more than $850 in donations were received, said Megan Lichter, a coordinator of the event through the Hillel Center and a family and consumer sciences sophomore.

    For Treadwell, growing out her hair for charity became an important part of her identity – some people didn’t like it and some people did, but overall she said it was an interesting process.

    “”It had more intrinsic value than just writing a check,”” she said.

    Treadwell said she was nervous before coming in to Great Clips in the Student Union Memorial Center, where the event was held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. yesterday.

    “”Friends would ask me, ‘Why are you nervous?’ but for two years it became part of my identity,”” she said.

    Treadwell said she is pleased she is able to help children who are suffering from long-term hair loss from diseases such as Alopecia areata and cancerous illnesses.

    “”With women, hair is an identity in itself,”” Treadwell said, mentioning how a child’s quality of life could be improved through her donation.

    Lichter said this is her second year planning the event but definitely not her last.

    “”It’s only one day of my whole year here,”” Lichter said.

    It’s all about the smile on the child’s face and alleviating the emotional pain from going through having a disease.

    -Laura Alberg, Sabino High School journalism teacher

    Through Locks of Love, children are able to overcome the social stigma associated with hair loss, Lichter said.

    Lichter said she was inspired to do the event again this year after seeing the amazing response from the community.

    “”We are playing a small role in changing their life and making it easier,”” she said.

    Laura Alberg, who is a journalism teacher at Sabino High school, had 11 inches of hair cut off yesterday and said growing out her hair was easy – especially after thinking of the children it would benefit.

    “”It’s about the smile on the child’s face and alleviating the emotional pain from going through having a disease,”” she said.

    Gina Crawford, an administrative secretary in pediatrics at University Medical Center, said she had been thinking about cutting her hair for a while, but after seeing an advertisement in the local paper, she decided it was time to chop it all off.

    “”I’m not a wasteful person, and I love the idea of the hair being used for a good purpose,”” she said.

    For more information about Locks of Love, visit www.locksoflove.org.

    Lichter said people who missed the event could still go to participating salons to have their hair donated to the organization.

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