The Student News Site of University of Arizona

The Daily Wildcat

83° Tucson, AZ

The Daily Wildcat

The Daily Wildcat

 

Career fair draws large crowd

Rodney Haas / Arizona Daily Wildcat

Alexis Higbee, a junior majoring in Spanish, center, speaks with U.S Army Sgt. Jeff Dozier, right, and UA Army ROTC Major Vernal Fulton about joining the Army during the UA Career Fair held in the Student Union Memorial Center yesterday. The fair, which goes on today from 11 AM to 4 PM, is a place for employers from all over the country come to the fair to talk to students about their company and how they hire.
Rodney Haas
Rodney Haas / Arizona Daily Wildcat Alexis Higbee, a junior majoring in Spanish, center, speaks with U.S Army Sgt. Jeff Dozier, right, and UA Army ROTC Major Vernal Fulton about joining the Army during the UA Career Fair held in the Student Union Memorial Center yesterday. The fair, which goes on today from 11 AM to 4 PM, is a place for employers from all over the country come to the fair to talk to students about their company and how they hire.

Seniors, there are 45 days until graduation. Today is the last day of the Spring Career Fair and time is running out, so bring your best suit and resume to the Grand Ballroom of the Student Union Memorial Center between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m.

The two-day fair has brought in recruiters from more than 100 companies.

The Pacific Islands Club, a resort in Saipan, has been coming to the UA for years. Saipan is the largest island in the Marianas, located in the northern Pacific Ocean near Guam.

Cole Pritchard, a representative of Pacific Islands Club, said the company offers six-month contracts to those interested in the hospitality and tourism industry. An average salary is about $750 a month.

“”Our company’s been participating (in the career fair) for the last four or five years. What we’re really trying to do is get young energetic young adults that are just out of school, and for our purposes, that don’t necessarily want to jump right into their career path,”” Pritchard said.

He said that in the past there has been some “”good talent”” that has come out of the UA, so the company returns year after year.

Wells Fargo Financial is another company that has been attending the UA’s career fair for years.

Luis Manjarrez, a UA alumnus and branch manager at the Wells Fargo at East Broadway Boulevard and North Country Club Road, said he’s been coming to the UA Career Fair as a representative for Wells Fargo Financial for several years.

“”I believe that all (the UA’s) colleges are really great, especially Eller. We’ve had really good experience with everybody that’s been hired from the U of A,”” he said.

Susan Miller, senior coordinator for marketing and special events at UA Career Services, said Career Services’ employer relations department has cultivated the university’s relationships with employers.

“”We’re a great venue, the students have a great reputation, so that’s why they come,”” she said.

All students are encouraged to attend the fair. There are full-time employment opportunities for seniors and internships for sophomores and juniors. Freshmen can familiarize themselves with the environment, Miller added.

She said that when the economy started faltering in 2008, there were about 300 tables at the Fall Career Fair, the largest the university had ever seen.

“”We are down to about half that now and it’s all due to the economy,”” Miller said.

She said it was still a large turnout, despite the challenging economic climate. 

“”The economy’s improving, I think it’s getting better,”” Miller said.

Kahli Nelson, a psychology senior who will graduate in May, hopes Miller is right. She talked to a few companies on Tuesday and plans to attend the career fair again today. Nelson hopes to find a job with a nonprofit organization.

On Tuesday she spoke to representatives from Intermountain Centers for Human Development and Hope, Inc., two Tucson-based nonprofits. Nelson said she is excited to talk with COPE Community Services, Inc., a nonprofit organization that works with Child Protective Services to help foster families, which will be represented at the fair today.

Although Nelson seemed at ease about the career fair, Miller said she is concerned that the fair can seem “”very intimidating to students.””

Miller’s advice: “”Take it in stride. Come prepared. Target particular companies that you’re particularly interested in. Have intelligent questions for them. Do a little research in advance. Have your resume with you. Just have the most polished presentation you can give and give it a shot. There’s nothing to lose.””

Knut Norstog, a non-degree seeking graduate student and UA employee, was optimistic.

This is the second university career fair he has attended. His first, at Creighton University in Omaha, Neb., had fewer tables and was mostly geared toward business majors.

Norstog, who received a bachelor’s degree in molecular and cellular biology from Creighton University in 2008, has been working at the UA since he graduated, but says it’s time for a change.

“”I’m thinking about switching careers just because molecular biology with a bachelor’s doesn’t pay very well,”” Norstog said. “”Yeah, it’s tough and there’s a recession, but it could be worse.””

He spoke with the United States Department of Agriculture, Ventana Medical Systems and University Directories on Tuesday.

“”Everyone should come regardless of how you’re dressed. Don’t come here trying to get a job, just come here to talk. If you’ve got a good attitude it’ll show through and it’ll help you out,”” Norstog said.

More to Discover
Activate Search