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The Daily Wildcat

The Daily Wildcat

 

    ¿Banda electronica? Sounds Kinky

    The sexy band Kinky may sing in Spanish, but their music crosses the genres of Indie rock, electronica, disco and even funk. Plus, theyre the only people that can pull off cowboy hats with suits without looking like members--- of the Bush administration.
    The sexy band Kinky may sing in Spanish, but their music crosses the genres of Indie rock, electronica, disco and even funk. Plus, they’re the only people that can pull off cowboy hats with suits without looking like members— of the Bush administration.

    It’s no surprise that Kinky borrows snippets from Mexican folk music; the catchy Latin electronic band got its start in Monterrey, Mexico.

    The disco-inspired, rock-tinged techno is a surprise, but it’s a welcome one.

    The members of Kinky, a band that got its name from the idea that going outside the boundaries is different, decided they wanted to incorporate the music they grew up with as well as the music they listened to as adults into their albums.

    During their childhood, Mexico City was the mecca of music and Monterrey was only known for their banda music. Banda music is heavy on accordions and guitars, with an emphasis on beats of either three or four. They can have narrative lyrics or take more of a pop approach to lyrical content.

    By the time the members of Kinky were older, Monterrey started becoming a huge center of the music industry, but Kinky was still hearing the same banda music. That’s when they became inspired to make albums.

    They are a huge success story in Monterrey, Mexico.

    The Arizona Daily Wildcat caught up with keyboardist Ulises Lozano by phone as he was arriving in Mexico City, Mexico to tour Kinky’s new album, Reina.

    “”There were a lot of people in Monterrey, Mexico, trying to do different things by the time we started recording our first album,”” Lozano said.

    He recalled wanting to incorporate the banda music as well as elements of classical and techno music.

    Reina shows a more confident, better-produced Kinky.

    “”We learned from our mishaps, and this helped us make the new album punchy and groovy like we wanted it,”” Lozano said.

    The album also has a live electronics sound, something that Lozano said took the group some time to figure out.

    “”Sister Twisted,”” the first single from Reina, has a heavy banda accordion that accompanies a strong techno downbeat simultaneously. The video is of a vaquero with a black cowboy hat and an ostrich belt dancing on a simulated dance floor.

    The rest of the album is heavy on the techno and light on the banda.

    “”We just want everyone to have fun with our music,”” Lozano said. The album mixes both English and Spanish lyrics.

    Lozano had a secret that he confided to the Wildcat. He said that he loves cheesy music, whether it be English or Spanish.

    “”I’m not talking like Britney Spears or anything, just other pop songs,”” Lozano said.

    Kinky will be playing Club Congress Monday at 6:30 p.m. Tickets will be $15 in advance and $17 at the door. It’s an all-ages show.

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