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The Daily Wildcat

The Daily Wildcat

 

Tucson bonds: see what your tax dollars could be paying for

A special bond election will be held on Nov. 3 in which voters will vote to approve seven ballot propositions. 

“If voters were to approve all seven propositions, the County would be authorized to sell $815,760,000 in general obligation bonds to fund projects that meet the purposes stated in each proposition,” according to the bond election’s page on the Pima County website. 

Voting registration for the election is now closed, but those who have registered can still learn more about the election’s propositions to get a better sense of them before voting yes or no.

The projects listed, with the exception of Proposition 425, are the three most expensive projects among a pool of many other projects connected to each proposition. 

The propositions to be submitted are as follows, according to the Pima County Board of Supervisors, Arizona’s official resolution:

Proposition No. 425

Road and Highway Improvements

If Proposition 425 were to be approved by the voter-base, Pima County would be authorized to issue and sell up to $200 million in bonds “for the purpose of improving, constructing, reconstructing, extending, repairing and preserving roads and highways in the county,” according to the Board of Supervisors of Pima County.

Proposition 425’s bond money would be divided into three projects:

Road repair and pavement preservation across Pima County ($160 million).

Building the Sonoran Corridor Highway, connecting I-10 to I-19 ($30 million).

Improving the Science Park Drive at UA Tech Park ($10 million).

Proposition No. 426

Economic Development, Libraries and Workforce Training 

If Proposition 426 were to be approved, over $91 million in bonds would be distributed for the purpose of “providing or improving real or personal property which promotes or preserves economic development and workforce training in the county,” through the installation of “job training facilities, business innovation centers, education facilities and libraries, commercial facilities,” and more, according to the board. 

These three projects would receive the largest divisions of Proposition 426’s bond money: 

Innovation/Technology Building, UA Tech Park at The Bridges: A new multi-tenant building dedicated to technology companies ($20 million) 

Southern Arizona Regional Orientation Center ($18 million)

Oro Valley Business Accelerator ($15 million)

Proposition No. 427

Tourism Promotion 

Proposition 427 would issue over $98 million for the purpose of “acquiring, developing, expanding, improving, reconstructing and equipping new and existing facilities promoting tourism in the county,” by bolstering “museums, cultural or recreational facilities, facilities for the arts,” and more.

These three projects would receive the largest divisions of Proposition 427’s bond money:

Restoring the Old Pima County Courthouse January 8th Memorial ($25 million)

Downtown Community Theaters and Historical Cultural Landscape ($23.5 million)

Canoa Ranch New Museum/Orientation Center and Improvements ($10 million)

Proposition No. 428

Parks and Recreational Facilities:

Proposition 428 would designate $191.5 million “for the purpose of acquiring, developing, expanding, improving and equipping new and existing parks and recreational facilities, including … athletic fields, senior centers, community centers and multi-use trails and trailheads,” according to the election’s voter information pamphlet.

These three projects would receive the largest divisions of Proposition 428’s bond money: 

Southwest Regional Sports Tournament Complex at Kino Complex ($25 million)

Sahuarita Pool and Recreation Complex ($14 million)

Marana Cultural and Heritage Park ($14 million)

Proposition No. 429

Public Health, Welfare, Safety, Neighborhoods and Housing

Proposition 429 is aiming to designate over $105 million “for the purpose of acquiring, developing, expanding, improving and equipping new and existing facilities to further the health, welfare and safety of the citizens of the county,” including “hospitals, clinics, facilities for the County Sheriff’s and County Medical Examiner’s offices, pedestrian safety improvements, food distribution facilities, improvements and proprperty to further neighborhood reinvestment,” and others.

These three projects would receive the largest divisions of Proposition 429’s bond money: 

Pima County Neighborhood Reinvestment Program ($25 million)

Pima County Affordable Housing Program ($20 million)

Banner University Medical Center South Campus County-Owned Facility Expansion ($18 million)

Proposition No. 430

Natural Area Conservation and Historic Preservation

Proposition 430 would assign over $112 million “for the purpose of acquiring, conserving, restoring, improving and providing recreational access to natural areas and historic properties in the county,” not limited to but including “open space, mountain parks, wildlife habitat, working ranches, washes and rivers to protect water quality …”

These three projects would receive the largest divisions of Proposition 430’s bond money, of which the first takes up the bulk:

Open Space Land Acquisition Program, whose purpose is to “expand national, state, county parkland and conservational areas for benefit of the community and wildlife,” according to an outline of the proposition on Pima County’s website. ($95 million)

Historic Fort Lowell Park Master Plan Implementation ($4 million)

Public Natural Park Trailheads ($3.75 million)

Proposition No. 431

Flood Control and Drainage

Proposition 431 would designate nearly $17 million “for the purpose of acquiring, developing, expanding, improving and equipping new and existing property for flood control and drainage purposes in the county,” including “bank stabilization, channels, drainage ways, dikes, levees and other flood control improvements,” according to the Board’s resolution.

These three projects would receive the largest divisions of Proposition 431’s bond money:

El Corazon – Santa Crus River: Rillito and CDO Confluence ($7 million)

Floodprone and Riparian Land Acquisition ($5 million)

Cemetery Wash Drainage Improvements , Tohono O’odham San Xavier District ($2 million)


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