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The Daily Wildcat

The Daily Wildcat

 

    Univ. Blvd set for new shops

    The recently completed section of the Marshall retail building boasts new stores that are appealing to students.  With the opening of new shops and restaurants the amount of people visiting University Avenue has vividly increased.
    The recently completed section of the Marshall retail building boasts new stores that are appealing to students. With the opening of new shops and restaurants the amount of people visiting University Avenue has vividly increased.

    In an effort to boost student clients and revenue, Main Gate Square is getting a makeover, with a slew of new stores opening within the next semester.

    The new retail establishments will grace University Boulevard between Park and Euclid avenues, an area also known as Main Gate Square.

    Merchants that will open later this semester in the newly constructed building on the northwest corner of University Boulevard and North Park Avenue include apparel store Beau Alexis, bath and body store Salud Spa Bar, locally owned convenience store Time Square Corner Market and cafes such as Cereal Boxx, Caffe Lusso and Jamba Juice, Marshall Foundation officials said.

    Jane McCollum, general manager of the Marshall Foundation, said new and old clothing stores on the street appreciate each other.

    “”Clothing begets clothing, and my retailers get that,”” McCollum said. “”Pitaya brought up American Apparel to us, so we contacted them to open up a store.””

    Even Mort Edberg, co-owner of Landmark Clothing, which has been in business since 1959, said he wants the new businesses to open.

    “”It’s great because it creates a tremendous amount of traffic here,”” Edberg said. “”Now kids no longer need to go to the mall, University is catering to UA students. Here we have lots of what they want.””

    However, University Boulevard shouldn’t be branded as another Mill Avenue, a Tempe hotspot for Arizona State U students.

    Edberg said Mill Avenue has lots of corporate stores in business, and he is happy that University Boulevard does not.

    “”If you take a look at Mill, there is not nearly as many local businesses,”” Edberg said. “”That is what makes us unique.””

    Kristine Ramey, manager of Pitaya Clothing, said she is interested in some of the new venues.

    “”The cereal bar (Ceral Boxx) is something that I’d like to do,”” Ramey said. “”The owner of Pitaya was interested in the area because it is a college town and the feel of the street.””

    Main Gate’s architecture fits in with the rest of the school, Ramey added.

    “”I think University fits into the school, it’s got that artsy feel and I know that the arts are a big deal here,”” Ramey said.

    Jake Rosenberg, an undeclared freshman, said for the most part, he supports the new stores. However, Rosenberg said he has some reservations about certain retailers.

    “”Honestly, Ed Hardy Clothing is just a boutique for metrosexuals and girls that like to blow money,”” Rosenberg said. “”I think that we need a record shop or a Blockbuster. I think those would get much more business.””

    Sean Spellman, a business management senior, said students will appreciate the additional shops near campus and the development will help bring the campus together.

    “”We’re starting to have more of our own community on campus,”” Spellman said. “”I’d like to see less tanning salons, think we have enough of those.””

    The Marshall Foundation, which was founded by Louise Foucar Marshall, UA’s first female professor, was established in 1930 to help young women.

    The foundation owns much of the land around the university, including the buildings on the northwest corner of University Boulevard and Park Avenue as well as the land the Marriott University Park hotel is on.

    The Louise Foucar Marshall building, however, was built on Marshall land and is under the ownership of a private firm. The Marshall Foundation rents out the bottom floor, while the UA rents the top four.

    Since it is a foundation, the organization donates the IRS-required 5 percent of its annual fair market value, 2.5 percent of which goes to the UA.

    The foundation donated an additional $250,000 to the UA’s College of Nursing this year, which McCollum said she sees as a contribution made in the mindset of Louise herself.

    “”That is how Mrs. Marshall set it up in 1930, because she wanted young women to go to school,”” McCollum said. “”There are lots of women here in nursing, so it is natural for the foundation to donate to the program.””

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