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The Daily Wildcat

The Daily Wildcat

 

“HPV forum to discuss female, male vaccination “

The large microbe on the right is a microscopic view of the most common sexually transmitted infection in the U.S.
The large microbe on the right is a microscopic view of the most common sexually transmitted infection in the U.S.

HPV, the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States, will be discussed tonight in Marana, Ariz.

The UA Women’s Studies Advisory Council, the Southwest Institute for Research on Women and the UA National Center of Excellence in Women’s Health will present the third community educational forum on  human papillomavirus infections and vaccinations.

“”We have an expert panel that will talk about the pros and cons of getting the HPV vaccine,”” said Leigh Spencer, UA Women’s Studies Advisory Council program coordinator.

“”Southwest Institute for Research on Women received a $5,000 grant from the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences to do three events on HPV,”” said Sally Stevens, executive director.  

“”The community forums will cover the practical aspect to addressing the issue of HPV,”” Stevens said.

The three UA centers decided to do an HPV forum because it’s a controversial topic in the media, and participants in other projects requested more information on it, Stevens said.

The community forum will feature a panel of five speakers including UA affiliates.

“”We try to bring panel of people who know about the vaccine, what is HPV and why the vaccine was developed,”” said Laurie Robinson, Women’s Studies Advisory Council Board Health Committee chair.

“”We will break out into sessions so people can interact with the panelists and ask specific questions regarding their needs with the vaccine,”” said Martha Monroy, program director of the UA National Center of Excellence for Women’s Health.

The goal of the forum is to provide objective information for community members to make decisions about whether the vaccine fits the needs of their families, Monroy said.

“”This is an opportunity for community members to get face time with the well renowned, well-received experts and community members don’t usually get to do that,”” Monroy said.

Robinson said this is a good opportunity to learn about what HPV is and how it is transmitted.

The event is designed for families, as well as teenage men and women. The HPV vaccine was approved for boys and men last year, Robinson said.  

“”The speakers may talk about other vaccines, the implications of the HPV vaccine’s approval status for men. There’s a big debate whether it’s useful or not to have men vaccinated,”” Spencer said.

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