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The Daily Wildcat

The Daily Wildcat

 

Taking steps against violence

Alex+Kulpinski+%2F+Daily+Wildcat%0A%0AUniversity+of+Arizona+students+dance+the+night+away+at+the+Honors+Student+Council+Dance+for+a+Cause+even+last+Friday+night.++The+theme+of+the+dance+was+It+Used+to+be+Cool+and+was+designed+to+help+give+back+to+the+community.+
Alex Kulpinski
Alex Kulpinski / Daily Wildcat University of Arizona students dance the night away at the Honors Student Council “Dance for a Cause” even last Friday night. The theme of the dance was “It Used to be Cool” and was designed to help give back to the community.

Students made giving back fun by dancing and donning costumes from decades past.

The Honors Student Council held its annual “Dance for a Cause” benefit on Friday with the theme “It Used To Be Cool,” and encouraged students to dress up in outfits from the ‘70s and ‘80s, according to Ashley Link, a freshman studying physiology and nutritional sciences and the council’s secretary and event planning coordinator. In support of the dance theme, Link wore neon purple leggings and an oversized crop top.

All proceeds from the dance were donated to the Emerge Center Against Domestic Abuse, a local nonprofit organization that provides shelter and domestic abuse prevention services in Southern Arizona. The food was provided by Redington Catering.

While most men who attended suited up, some women wore bright neon colors and pinned their hair up high while others donned ruffled dresses.

The event taught council members how to communicate with nonprofit organizations within the community, said Honors Student Council president Natalie Lucas, a junior studying environmental science, philosophy, politics, economics and law.

The Honors Student Council has also donated funds to larger organizations, including those providing support to victims of the 2010 Haiti earthquake. Last year, the benefit dance made more than $600 for the Southern Arizona Mental Health Corporation, a nonprofit organization that provides free medical care for people with mental illnesses.

Fundraising Officer Alissa Delafuente, a junior studying creative writing and English, said the council typically aims for about 100 students to attend events. This was the first year that canned food donations were taken in exchange for tickets at the door.

By the end of the night, 52 people had been at the dance, which generated $210 for Emerge and 30 cans of food. Putting on events for the community service week, Link said, required a group effort from the council and was exciting for students because they have the opportunity to work with a variety of organizations.

The “Dance for a Cause” benefit started five years ago, but this is the first year that the Honors Student Council will put on an entire week of volunteering-based events. Lucas said she hopes that the volunteer week will eventually turn into an annual event.

“I am excited about meeting other honors students and it’s fun to put on events that help others,” Lucas said. “It’s something tangible to see.”

By putting on different events, the council members aim to teach students about organizations within the community, Lucas said, and gets students away from studying by giving back and supporting others.

Each event will benefit a different cause, and anyone is welcome to participate, Lucas added.

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