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The Daily Wildcat

The Daily Wildcat

 

    Brahms piece to comfort Crowder Hall

    Music doctoral student Jennaya Robison rehearses Ein Deutsches Requiem with the Arizona Symphony Orchestra led by Bruce Chamberlain. The concert is a culmination of a semesters worth of work for the choir.
    Music doctoral student Jennaya Robison rehearses “”Ein Deutsches Requiem”” with the Arizona Symphony Orchestra led by Bruce Chamberlain. The concert is a culmination of a semester’s worth of work for the choir.

    The Arizona Symphony Orchestra, the Arizona Choir and the Symphonic Choir will be performing a piece of Johannes Brahms’s “”Ein deutsches Requiem”” at Crowder Hall tomorrow and Sunday.

    The piece is considered to be Brahms’s largest work. After his mother’s death in 1865, he began working on “”Ein deutsches Requiem”” in hopes “”to comfort the living,”” rather than the dead. The title reflects the selection of verses Brahms chose from the Lutheran Bible.

    “”(The piece) is absolutely the epitome of what we understand of 19th-century choral masterpieces,”” said music professor Bruce Chamberlain, who will conduct. “”The music and the text are so integrally united.””

    Talents performing will include soprano soloist Jennaya Robison, a music doctoral student; music professor Charles Roe; and Chamberlain.

    “”We are bringing together 160 students to focus their talents and abilities on a single piece,”” Chamberlain said.

    “”We are gathering folks from different degree plans to speak this music.””

    Chamberlain described the piece to be “”seven movements of transcendent”” music. His choir has been rehearsing the piece since the beginning of the semester.

    When deciding on this piece and others, Chamberlain said he and associate music professor Thomas Cockrell decided on Brahms’s piece early last spring.

    When asked what the audience should expect to hear at the performance, Chamberlain said, “”They should expect to hear absolutely glorious music.””

    “”If you have never heard the Brahms, you don’t want to miss it,”” he said. “”And if you have heard it, you don’t want to miss it. People will simply be transported to a different place.””

    The performance will be held in the School of Music’s Crowder Hall tomorrow at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday at 3 p.m.

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