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The Daily Wildcat

The Daily Wildcat

 

Child stars shine brighter than the rest

“”I’m a get more shine in a little bit,”” says Willow Smith. Girl, you already got a whole lot of shine and it’s just going to keep on coming.

The minute the paint-splattering “”Whip My Hair”” video premiered, I knew she was going to be a mind-blowing star.

Literally, this girl is a phenomenon. Willow, at 10 years old with baby’s-bottom skin and bones smaller than my fingers, has people in their mid-20s bumping and grinding to her single in the hottest clubs. Willow will be this generation’s Madonna. Her debut album drops soon, according to her Twitter (yes, she is one of the 10 remarkable people I have chosen to follow), and she’s signed with Roc Nation, one of the biggest labels in the industry headed by Jay-Z.

On the topic of pre-pubescent stardom, obviously Justin Bieber reluctantly needs to be mentioned. P.S., Willow is the opening act in his upcoming tour.

This kid is the next Michael Jackson. He has 7-year-old girls crying over him and has become a household name across not just the nation, but the globe. The combination of Bieber and Smith gives me the chills. These two child mega-stars are probably more successful than about 90 percent of the United States combined, roughly. It seems as if fame can almost be accredited to age in today’s pop culture cult. The younger, the more famous they will continue to become. But naturally, there have to be haters who claim that Will Smith and Jada Pinkett are thrusting their kids in the spotlight, and that Justin Bieber is the spawn of the devil. Jealous much? If my kid looked like Bieber (minus the bowl cut) and could whip like Willow, I would be thrusting them too. They deserve the amount of fame and success that has come their way. While we were spending our adolescent days in the ball-pen of Chuck E. Cheese’s, these kids spent hours in the studio to give us a reason to wake up in the morning.

Yes, Lindsay Lohan, Demi Lovato, Aaron Carter and even little Hannah Montana have given us something to talk about by landing in rehab and other institutions at an early age. But child fame is not to blame. Personally, the Bieber fever does not wake me up every morning, but it does for a lot of people. Stars like Willow and Justin have a positive future ahead and have already given so many kids a role model to look up to.

Putting a talented child in the public eye is not always harmful. The truly successful stars are the ones who make their names big with natural talent and do not use the 48-point font across Us Weekly’s cover to their advantage.

The circuit of fame now requires singing, acting, dancing and extreme swag in leather and studs. If you can’t whip paint around without looking like an idiot, you are not going to make it. If you hate that a 10 and 16-year-old are getting more attention than other significant public figures, get over it because they are here to stay.

Thank you to the Smiths and the Biebers for getting it on and giving us the next two pop sensations of a lifetime.

— Caroline Nachazel is a sophomore majoring in journalism and communication. She can be reached at letters@wildcat.arizona.edu.

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