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The Daily Wildcat

The Daily Wildcat

 

    UA community speaks out against Prop. 107

    A crowd applauds former President Peter Likins after remarks made at the rally against Proposition 107 on the UA Mall yesterday. Likins said the rally was not to rile up current supporters, but to help swing voters understand why he and others are opposing the proposition, in hopes of winning their votes.
    A crowd applauds former President Peter Likins after remarks made at the rally against Proposition 107 on the UA Mall yesterday. Likins said the rally was not to rile up current supporters, but to help swing voters understand why he and others are opposing the proposition, in hopes of winning their votes.

    Most people do not understand the subtle details that Proposition 107 includes so the proposition is misleading to the public, said former President Peter Likins at an anti-proposition rally on the UA Mall yesterday.

    Likins, who was joined by college deans, faculty, students and staff, spoke about the importance of educating people about the negative effects the proposition would have on the UA and the rest of the state.

    “”This is not about protecting marriage; it’s about denying benefits to domestic partners and their families, straight or gay,”” Likins said. “”I truly believe that if the voters understand the proposition, they would vote no.””

    Marie Swanson, dean of the College of Public Health, said if the proposition passed at the Nov. 7 general election, discrimination would be official in the state of Arizona.

    Swanson said many people informed her they would leave Arizona and never return if the proposition were to pass, and Swanson told the crowd to think about the wonderful people Arizona would lose.

    “”Lets not make Arizona an embarrassment to the world,”” Swanson said.

    Jewel Kling, a second-year medical student and speaker at the rally, said Prop. 107 will have negative effects on her future patients, including loss of health care insurance benefits and visitation rights for domestic partners.

    Twenty-four percent of Arizonans do not have health insurance, and the number will increase if the proposition is passed, Kling said.

    Prop. 107 will also overturn domestic violence protection laws for domestic partners, she added.

    Jarrett Hines, a graduate student in business administration, said Prop. 107 will negatively impact businesses in Arizona.

    More than 60 percent of Fortune 500 businesses, including Raytheon, offer domestic partner benefits in order to recruit the most highly-qualified workers available, but companies will lose competitive employees if the proposition passes and these benefits will no longer be permitted by the state, Hines said.

    The proposition would also eliminate parking pass benefits from hospital visitation rights, limit the UA’s ability to recruit the most highly qualified students, faculty, and staff, and hurt the overall quality of life due to increased intolerance in Arizona, said Fenton Johnson, an associate professor of English and a member of the President’s Advisory Program Council on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender issues.

    “”This is hypocrisy in the name of conservativism,”” Likins said during his speech. “”Barry Goldwater would be rolling over in his grave.””

    Not all Republicans are voting “”yes”” on Prop. 107, and personal views on the matter do not necessarily correspond with a political party, said Erin McMahon, a junior majoring in Spanish and member of the College Republicans.

    “”I don’t support the proposition, and very few of us voted ‘yes.’ We are pretty open-minded people despite the public opinion,”” McMahon said.

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