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The Daily Wildcat

 

    Art and heritage color second latin film festival

    	Clasa Films Mundiales
The film “Frida Naturaleza Viva” originally premiered in 1983. It is one of the films that will be shown during the Latin Film Festival.

    Clasa Films Mundiales
    The film “Frida Naturaleza Viva” originally premiered in 1983. It is one of the films that will be shown during the Latin Film Festival.

    The second annual Latin Film Festival kicked off Tuesday night with a movie about Mexican painter Frida Kahlo, “Frida Naturaleza Viva.” The festival aims to promote culture and education through film and spans three consecutive nights.

    Each night, a different facilitator who has studied the social and political environment surrounding the film’s creation will lead a “charla,” or discussion, following the movie.

    “We choose movies that provide a platform for discussion between students and professors,” said Melissa Silva, the organizer of the Latin Film Festival.

    The first film shown, “Frida Naturaleza Viva,” was directed in 1983 by Paul Leduc. The movie, whose title translates to “Frida Still Life,” shows events that influenced Kahlo’s life, including her childhood, health problems, marriage with painter Diego Rivera and political connections to Mexican history. This portrayal of the painter won eight Ariel Awards in Mexico, including best screenplay and best direction. Ariel Awards are the most prestigious cinematic awards in Mexico.

    Adjunct history professor Rebecca Orozco led the discussion.
    Drama-thriller “Dulces compañias” will be shown today, presenting a complex crime story. The storyline is based upon political writer Laura Restrepo’s novel, with the story unfolding around the supposed appearance of an angel in a poor neighborhood of a city.
    Director Óscar Blancarte won the award for Best Direction at the Ourense Independent Film Festival for this 1996 movie. Arturo Chacon will facilitate the night’s conversation.

    On Thursday, the last night of the festival, director Rafael Montero’s 1995 comedy film “Cilantro y perejil” will be shown. Presenting a story of couples affected by Mexico’s economic crisis, the film explores relationships within one family affected by hardships, and the driving human question of why people stay committed to one another. Following the screening, Mexican Consul Oscar Holguin will share his thoughts regarding the film.

    The Latin film festival began after a transnational colloquium event in April of last year brought together Silva and members of the Mexican Consulate. The festival currently partners with the Mexican consulate to create a space for the communication and understanding of Latin identity through film.

    “The unique thing about this festival is that each film comes straight from the Mexican vault,” Silva said.

    The films will be screened each night at 6 p.m., with a reception of light Latin snacks before. The festival is held at the UA’s South campus in Cochise College’s Building 700, room 708. UA South is located in Douglas, Ariz., about a two-hour drive south toward the border. The event is free and everyone is welcome.

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