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The Daily Wildcat

The Daily Wildcat

 

    Rec could reconsider no-refund policy

    Physiology senior and fitness instructor Morgan Arnold checks students CatCards and fitness passes at the door of a core class yesterday at the Student Recreation Center. The Rec Center has sold so many passes that some students cannot attend every class.
    Physiology senior and fitness instructor Morgan Arnold checks students’ CatCards and fitness passes at the door of a ‘core’ class yesterday at the Student Recreation Center. The Rec Center has sold so many passes that some students cannot attend every class.

    A recreation advisory committee has decided to hold an open meeting to discuss refund policies for students who prepay for overcrowded fitness classes after hearing concerns from Student Recreation Center patrons.

    Students who purchase passes for Rec Center “”core”” classes are given a rain check as opposed to a refund if the course is full – a policy that was originally developed to ensure continuity, said Juliette Moore, campus recreation director.

    “”We didn’t want people to just sign up and then immediately want a refund,”” Moore said.

    But Jennie Weiss, an elementary education senior who takes a class Tuesdays and Thursdays, said it is unfair to students that do not get refunds because the classes are often full.

    “”I think it’s screwed up that people don’t get a refund for their money,”” Weiss said. “”If they paid for it, they should get their money back.””

    There is no limit on the number of semester passes sold, and “”it’s more of a determination based on attendance,”” Moore said.

    Students can purchase either a semester-long pass for $75, which gives access to most of the classes and times offered, or they can pay $6 for a day pass.

    Courtney Brazil, a business senior, said she purchased a day pass for a Thursday afternoon “”core”” class with her credit card, but was turned away from the class since it was full.

    When she asked to get a refund, Brazil said Rec Center employees told her they do not give credit card refunds. They offered her a rain check, which she declined.

    “”I felt like they handled the whole situation really unprofessionally,”” Brazil said. “”At any other gym, they would have given the customer their money back. It’s because this is a student center that they feel like they can take advantage of college kids.””

    But Moore said the Rec Center is not trying to make a profit off students.

    It costs more to process a refund than the refund itself, which is why the Rec Center has a rain check policy, Moore said.

    “”(The policy) is something we can look into, and it may be an issue of just missed communication between the instructor and the pro shop,”” she said.

    Morgan Arnold, a physiology senior who has been teaching “”core”” for three and a half years, said students wishing to get into the class should arrive five to 10 minutes early.

    “”If I choose to use (exercise) balls, that’s when I will limit the class,”” Arnold said. “”If I don’t use balls, I try and alternate every day so more people can get in.””

    The room normally holds 45 people but can accommodate more if mats are used, Arnold said.

    Although the no-refund policy is in place, Moore said the Rec Center welcomes students’ input and wants to hear their comments and concerns. The meeting regarding the policy will be Tuesday in the Rec Center conference room, second floor.

    “”We have changed policies in the past”” Moore said. “”We want to do what students want.””

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