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The Daily Wildcat

The Daily Wildcat

 

    Best Americana that side of the Atlantic

    Swedish rockers Amandine play folk music and are heavily influenced by American pop culture. How those two blend together is a mystery, but one can find out by seeing them play at Solar Culture tomorrow night at 9.
    Swedish rockers Amandine play folk music and are heavily influenced by American pop culture. How those two blend together is a mystery, but one can find out by seeing them play at Solar Culture tomorrow night at 9.

    In its debut album, Amandine has created some of the most beautiful expressions of Americana and American folk music in the last 50 years. After a listen, you can’t help but conjure up visions of warm baked apple pies, grits, hot dogs from the baseball game and surstrÇômming.

    While Amandine may play American folk ballads, it is actually from MalmÇô, in southern Sweden. Although the band is signed to Fat Cat Records, an international label with such big names as Sigur Ros and Animal Collective, it doesn’t have plans to move any time in the near future.

    With his strong Swedish accent, singer Olaf GidlÇôf explains the situation.

    “”We sent a demo to them and a couple weeks later, we got an e-mail from them saying they liked the music and nothing really more than that,”” he said. “”We’ve been extremely lucky to be picked up, because they get like 200 demos a week or something.””

    Fat Cat has propelled Amandine into the spotlight by giving support in the form of high quality agents and also international recognition.

    The band has garnered popularity from all over the world, but especially in America.

    “”It comes kind of natural because from an early age we were heavily influenced by American culture, MTV and stuff,”” GidlÇôf said. “”And they teach you English in school from an early age.””

    Although there are a few bands that sing in Swedish from his home country, most consider English an easier language to write songs in. Add to that a heavy influx of American folk influences, and you have Sweden’s next Johnny Cash (or CashstrÇômmburg.)

    Although it might seem that Amandine is heavily concerned with hitting it big in America, the band haven’t really thought about it. GidlÇôf said that he didn’t even realize it sounded American until journalists began to ask them about it.

    GidlÇôf’s first concern was about the music.

    “”It’s kind of hard to describe,”” he said. “”A Swedish feeling of kind of a lonely desolate feeling with some warmth to it. We just try to play simple but heartfelt music.””

    Although the band’s first EP Leave Out the Sad Parts was only released in America, it has another addition of different songs that will go to Europe in the future.

    Amandine is also working on a new record that will hopefully be released in 2007. The band start recording over the summer, as well as organizing a European tour.

    Amandine will be playing at Solar Culture on Friday. Tickets are $6 and it will start at 9 p.m.

    Questions:

    CD – The new Calexico album

    Movie – “”Delicatessen,”” a French flick

    Last food eaten – El Pollo Loco

    Celebrity dream date – Audrey Tautou from “”Amelie””

    Item of clothing – vests

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