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The Daily Wildcat

The Daily Wildcat

 

“Students use laptops, ILC”

Lisa Beth Earle/ Arizona Daily Wildcat

Holly Parker, an undecided freshman, works on her laptop in the Integrated Learning Center on Wednesday, Feb. 10. She enjoys using her own laptop at school but uses the ILCs desktop computers when she doesnt bring her heavy laptop.
Lisa Beth Earle
Lisa Beth Earle/ Arizona Daily Wildcat Holly Parker, an undecided freshman, works on her laptop in the Integrated Learning Center on Wednesday, Feb. 10. She enjoys using her own laptop at school but uses the ILC’s desktop computers when she doesn’t bring her heavy laptop.

Whether for convenience, software or just plain laziness, computer labs all over campus, such as the Manuel T. Pacheco Integrated Learning Center, are still frequented by students, despite the rise in the number of students who own laptops.

A recent study by the EDUCAUSE Center for Applied Research surveyed nearly 28,000 students at over 100 colleges and universities and confirmed that, from 2004 to 2008, laptop ownership rose from 46.8 percent to over 75 percent. Many students own two computers, Web-enabled cell phones and mp3 players.

Only 3.9 percent did not own a computer of any kind.

“”We’ve had about a 300 percent increase in people sitting in the area someplace but are using a laptop rather than a desktop,”” said Michael Brewer, the director of the Information Commons in the ILC.

The number of computers in the ILC has not changed since it opened in 2002, Brewer said. She added that the usage of the computers is slightly down, but the number of people using the space is up 5 to 10 percent since it opened.

According to a study by the Campus Computing Project, 11 percent of colleges around the nation, including the University of Virginia and Temple University, feel that it’s time to start phasing out computer labs around campus to cut costs.

Kate Rehkopf, the interim associate director of the UA’s University Information Technology Services disagrees with this cost-cutting technique.

If a student doesn’t have a personal computer, doesn’t want to lug it around campus, can’t afford expensive software or wants to print something they would be unable to at home, the ILC and the Office of Student Computing Resources labs provide a much-needed service, Rehkopf said.

Student responses mirrored many of Brewer and Rehkopf’s sentiments.

“”I’ve used it before because it’s a really good meeting place,”” said Lauren Redman, a freshman majoring in English and creative writing. “”If (students) have their own computer … then they probably have their own study space … but it’s a good thing to have around if students can’t afford one or don’t have space for (a computer).””

 

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