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The Daily Wildcat

The Daily Wildcat

 

    Pageant promotes alcohol awareness

    Jamie Bales, a psychology freshman and member of the Alpha Phi sorority, celebrates after being announced the winner of the second annual Miss Greek pageant presented by Sigma Pi in the South Grand Ballroom of the Student Union Memorial Center last night. The pageant also served as an alcohol awareness event to warn students about the dangers of alcohol consumption.
    Jamie Bales, a psychology freshman and member of the Alpha Phi sorority, celebrates after being announced the winner of the second annual Miss Greek pageant presented by Sigma Pi in the South Grand Ballroom of the Student Union Memorial Center last night. The pageant also served as an alcohol awareness event to warn students about the dangers of alcohol consumption.

    Fraternity. Money. Alcohol.

    These words seem to fit the stereotypical mindset of any non-Greek student.

    Fraternities are known, more or less, for the parties they throw and their members are often labeled as rich kids because of their association with such a group.

    Some Greek organizations, however, are looking to change the negative connotations often associated with their way of life.

    The Sigma Pi fraternity put on the second Miss Greek competition yesterday in efforts to raise money for an alcohol awareness foundation.

    The Miss Greek pageant consisted of several rounds including a talent portion and a Q-and-A section, resulting in a win from the Alpha Phi sorority.

    “”We’re here today to help raise money for the Sam Spady Foundation,”” said Nick Ventura, a history junior and the president of Sigma Pi. “”What they do is they go around to different campuses and have educational programs about the safe consumption of alcohol.””

    The foundation is named after Samantha Spady, a 19-year-old student at Colorado State University, who died of alcohol poisoning at the Sigma Pi fraternity house on the CSU campus Sept. 5, 2004.

    “”It does seem kind of ironic I guess to those not in the Greek community because there is a stereotype about Greek life , but this shows that there is more to us than all of that stuff other people think,”” said Nathaniel Barlow, a biomedical sciences freshman and the philanthropy chair of Sigma Pi. “”Historically people have this image of frats partying all the time, but events like this show we are more than that.””

    Reid Pampe, a business economics sophomore and a member of Sigma Pi, agrees.

    “”Yeah, we might throw parties and stuff, but it’s mainly about promoting responsibility,”” Pampe said.

    Ventura explained that besides raising money, one of the main goals of the evening was to help defy the stereotypes often associated with the Greek community.

    “”Regardless of what people do or say, underage consumption will still happen,”” Ventura said. “”The important thing is that people are smart about it.””

    Lauren Hassom, an acting freshman who was at the pageant supporting her sorority, understands why the fundraiser was important.

    “”It all seems kind of strange because alcohol does play a major part in the Greek community, but they are doing their part to make sure that people understand it can be dangerous,”” Hassom said.

    The planning for the pageant began over five months ago because of changes from the event last year, Barlow said.

    This year Sigma Pi upgraded their venue from the Social Sciences building’s Room 100 to the Grand Ballroom in the Student Union Memorial Center in order to accommodate more people for a nicer event, Ventura said.

    “”This is Sigma Pi’s national foundation and that is why it is our main philanthropy project for the year,”” Ventura said. “”Last year we raised over $2,000 and that was a smaller venue. This year we expect more than that.””

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