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The Daily Wildcat

The Daily Wildcat

 

    Annie’s Lucy Werner started at the theatre bottom, now she’s here

    Music will fill Centennial Hall this week with the arrival of the touring production of “Annie.”

    The classic show encompasses the life of a spunky red-headed orphan, Annie, who believes her family will rescue her and features a set of antagonists ranging from infamous orphan caretaker Miss Hannigan to couple Rooster Hannigan and Lily St. Regis, who attempt to con Daddy Warbucks out of his money.

    Lucy Werner, who plays St. Regis, has been in theater since the age of 9, when her singing teacher encouraged her to audition for the community theater production of “Annie.”

    “My voice teacher actually had me audition for the community theater production of ‘Annie,’” she said. “So, I got the role of Annie, and it was my first show ever, and I fell in love with theater.”

    While Werner played the titular character at the age of 9, the role of St. Regis is a change for her. She said that her first role out of college as St. Regis offers a change in experience from her first community theater “Annie” role to her current role as an adult.

    “It was community theater—so, very different. I think being a little kid and doing ‘Annie’ is probably the most exciting thing you could ever do. … It’s adults taking kids seriously, so it was very fun,” Werner said. “But it’s fun for me as an adult to revisit the show and love it in a different way. … It’s super fun to see it in a different light and to do it professionally. … It’s kinda fun to go full circle.”

    Playing the role of St. Regis also gives Werner the opportunity to fill some rather large shoes; the role was once played by Kristin Chenoweth in the 1999 film adaption and Bernadette Peters in the 1982 film.
    “I guess I’m just trying to put my own spin on it, and be myself and still live up to that ditzy, blonde character,” she said.

    In terms of touring, Werner said that her favorite tour location thus far was Tampa, Fla.: her home town.
    “It was so cool to go perform at the theater where I had grown up going to see shows,” she said. “I remember so clearly going to see ‘Wicked’ there as a child and going to see all these shows as a little kid. Then I got to perform on that stage with all my friends and family there to see me, and it was just such a wonderful thing to be home.”

    Arriving in Tucson, she said she isn’t really sure what she would like to do here.

    She said when she tours she usually asks people who live in the area what she should do, in addition to finding a yoga studio. She said that she usually tries to do what the people who actually live there like to do.
    As for what the audience and fans of the show can expect going into the production, Werner said, “they should expect classic ‘Annie.’”

    She went on to elaborate that it is the original story, plot line, characters, look, music and dancing.

    “It’s just classic,” she said.

    Werner said Annie’s core is all about finding family in an unconventional way, and that it is about love. She added that the show shows that family doesn’t have to be the people you grow up with; it can be the people you find.

    “It’s also a great show to take the kids to,” she said.

    “Annie” plays at Centennial Hall and will run from Tuesday through Oct. 4.


    Follow Ariella Noth on Twitter.


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