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The Daily Wildcat

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The Daily Wildcat

The Daily Wildcat

 

    “Prop. 300 costly, opponents say”

    Lorraine Lee, director of Chicanos Por La Causa, speaks against Proposition 300 to a crowd of nearly 40 at the James E. Rogers Plaza yesterday afternoon. If passed, Prop. 300 will require illegal immigrants to pay out-of-state tuition, deny them adult education and deny the children of undocumented immigrants citizenship rights such as child care.
    Lorraine Lee, director of Chicanos Por La Causa, speaks against Proposition 300 to a crowd of nearly 40 at the James E. Rogers Plaza yesterday afternoon. If passed, Prop. 300 will require illegal immigrants to pay out-of-state tuition, deny them adult education and deny the children of undocumented immigrants citizenship rights such as child care.

    If Proposition 300 is passed Nov. 7, it could cost the state and the state’s universities more money and discriminate against an entire group of people, said politicians and UA student group leaders who oppose the measure.

    Leaders of Hispanic and Latino student groups from the UA and Pima Community College met yesterday at a press conference with state and local politicians to discuss the implications of the proposition, which would deny some state-funded education and child care services to undocumented immigrants.

    State Sen. Jorge Luis Garcia said that if passed, the proposition would require universities and colleges to review proof of citizenship documentation to approve a student for in-state tuition. If documentation is not provided, the student would be charged as an international student or would pay out-of-state tuition.

    Using the tables on the Mall is an effective way to get information to students, Rebling said.

    “”We are on the Mall every day,”” Rebling said. “”There are 30,000 students, so we’re mainly campaigning to them.””
    Rebling said the College Republicans are also going to hold roadside rallies with signs to increase name recognition of candidates.

    The main idea is to get the information out there, Rebling said.

    “”I’m actually quite impressed with the number of students who are not informed but who want to be more informed and come by to get information,”” Rebling said.

    Antoinette Grijalva, a communication junior, said she gets most of her information through television and newspaper coverage.
    A voter guide could be useful for voters who are serious about researching the candidates, Grijalva said.

    “”The only problem with that is that it needs to be short and sweet,”” Grijalva said. “”If the packet is too fat, people won’t want to skim through it.””

    The average voter wants his news in a nutshell, Grijalva said.

    Voter guides will be handed out this week and on Election Day. Also, there will be shuttles to the polls from campus Nov. 7, Rodl said.

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