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The Daily Wildcat

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The Daily Wildcat

The Daily Wildcat

 

    Creating tees for a cause

    Retailing and Consumer Science majors, from the left, Natalie Doose, sophomore, Courtney Mckenna, senior, Rebecca Schotz, junior, Allie Allen, senior, and Kyle Johnson, senior, show off their T-Shirts as a promotion for a event they are holding on the mall today.
    Retailing and Consumer Science majors, from the left, Natalie Doose, sophomore, Courtney Mckenna, senior, Rebecca Schotz, junior, Allie Allen, senior, and Kyle Johnson, senior, show off their T-Shirts as a promotion for a event they are holding on the mall today.

    In the face of school budget cuts, some UA students are hoping to open some minds and wallets to save art education.

    A group of retailing and consumer science students are hoping to raise funds and awareness for the Opening Minds Through the Arts program today on the UA Mall by encouraging passersby to make creative t-shirts for the cause.

    “”We are all retailing majors and creativity is a major part of retail,”” said Rebecca Schotz, a retailing and consumer sciences junior. “”It is also rewarding on a local level, since it will support the Tucson Unified School District.””

    Tucson elementary schools often cut art programs first during a budget crunch because they aren’t viewed as necessities, said Natalie Doose, a retailing and consumer sciences sophomore.

    The students are asking for donations of $5, and in return, people will be able to decorate a t-shirt with spray paint and stencils.

    The Tucson Unified School District recently adopted the Opening Minds through the Arts program in order to enhance student’s academic achievement through participation in art and music programs. There are currently over 19,000 students and 700 teachers in 44 schools participating in the program in Tucson.

    “”(OMA) is benefiting younger generations of Tucson and allowing students to partake in creative school programs,”” Doose said.

    OMA uses the arts as a tool to teach elementary school and middle school academic standards in math, science, reading, writing and social studies, said Sally Trattner, a member of the board of directors of the OMA foundation.

    “”We call it a remarkable student achievement and school performance program,”” Trattner said. “”It’s a message of instruction that makes a huge impact on children.””

    Trattner said students who have been involved in the program have shown major improvements in school, which is reflected in their standardized test scores.

    “”I think its terrific that they are helping a program that helps students and teachers, it really shows community partnership,”” she said

    “”I think it’s going to be great,”” Kyle Johnson, retailing and consumer sciences senior, said. “”We will also be having a representative from OMA there speaking, to answer any questions students might have about where the money is going. It’s an opportunity for students to learn about the community they are helping.””

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