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The Daily Wildcat

The Daily Wildcat

 

    Career daze hits grads

    Sergeant First Class Julian Gonzalez, a U.S. Army recruiter, speaks with a student at the UA Career Day held in the Grand Ballroom of the Student Union Memorial Center yesterday afternoon.
    Sergeant First Class Julian Gonzalez, a U.S. Army recruiter, speaks with a student at the UA Career Day held in the Grand Ballroom of the Student Union Memorial Center yesterday afternoon.

    The UA Spring Career Days kicked off yesterday to help seniors avoid walking down the graduation aisle grasping a diploma in one hand and a French fries scoop in the other.

    But this semester’s career fair won’t be as large as past events, said Susan Miller, senior coordinator of marketing and special events at UA Career Services.

    “”It has everything to do with the economy,”” Miller said. “”Despite the fact that it is smaller than it’s been previously, (the UA) still has 150 tables over the two days of the event, and these are recruiters who are seriously recruiting.””

    The UA Spring Career Days runs through April 1 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., and is held in the Student Union Memorial Center Third Floor Ballroom. Employers from nonprofit, government, health care and industry/business organizations are attending the event.

    UA Career Services holds one large Career Days event per semester with the typical student turnout being between 1,500 and 2,000 per day, but Miller expects it to be higher this year.

    “”With the economy the way it is, I would imagine students who would really want to find a job are going to do everything they can,”” Miller said.

    Communications senior Jon Manfre came to Career Days seeking a job in public relations or human resources and likes the convenience the event provides UA students but still has his worries about the current job market.

    “”My main concern is just finding work so I don’t have to live off of my parents for the rest of my life.”” Manfre said. “”I figured (the career fair) would be a great place because all these employers come to (the UA), so I don’t have to go searching, it’s all right here.””

    With the current state of the economy, political sciences senior Miguel Valadez doesn’t believe that starting a successful career is going to be as easy as simply handing a bachelor’s degree to a potential employer.

    “”It’s just more than a bachelor’s degree, you also need experience, people who you have to know within an organization,”” Valadez said. “”We’re pretty much in a dog-eat-dog world.””

    Despite the post-graduation difficulties he’ll face, Valadez hopes that with his degree and the internship he plans on doing that he’ll land a career relating to government administration.

    “”I would like (employers) to see me kind of like a Blue Chip stock,”” Valadez said.

    It’s the uncertainty and competitive nature of the current job market and life after graduation that has physiology senior Stacy Hartmann on edge.

    “”I’m terrified,”” Hartmann said. “”I’m going to grad school, but I’m working until then, so I’m worried about getting a job, getting a good job.””

    After she graduates from the UA this May, Hartmann plans on taking physician assistant graduate classes at the University of Southern California.

    For students who want to boost their chances of making a good impression on potential employers, Miller recommends dressing up, do research on a company they’re interested in, ask questions and have copies of their resumes ready.

    “”Students are probably going to have to talk to more companies and put out more resumes and make sure that everything they do is exactly what they need to do. (Career Services) always says that, but it’s probably more critically important in a time when there are fewer jobs available,”” Miller said.

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